Why do you love film? opinions needed for article

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by RedStarRevels, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. cigrainger

    cigrainger TPF Noob!

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    A lot of why I use film has already been summed up in this thread... namely, I just prefer it. No matter how good digital gets, it will never look like film. Be it the grain, tonality, whatever. That's not saying one's superior, they're just different, and I prefer film personally.

    I love the fact that a film negative is an actual physical piece of something that happened or was seen. The actual light from that scene affected the silver halide, and the negative (or slide) captured that moment in time in a tangible form.

    I also prefer getting all excited with a roll of film to come home and develop it rather than instant feedback on the 2.5" screen on the back of my digital. I don't like instant feedback. While there have been a few times that I got excited about a roll of film only to ruin it like an idiot, I still prefer that.

    Film also limits your exposures. Rather than just snapping away like an idiot, I think and compose with film, and unsurprisingly this shows up in my final result. I can go shoot all day with my digital, hundreds of shots, and come home with 20-30 good ones, whereas on a 35mm 36 exp roll I come home with 20+ quality shots pretty regularly and most of the other exposures were simply duplicates.


     
  2. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    The films we have available to us now are, in general, the best there have ever been. Both Kodak and Fuji have continued to improve their emulsions over the past few years. More improvement is possible, but what matters is what is available for use now. The current version of Portra 800 is a remarkable film for its speed, for example.

    We have lost some of the fringe films, most of which were made by Kodak. The writing has been on the wall for a number of films for some time, and the surprise has been how long they stayed in production. I used to use a lot of Ektachrome 320T (EPJ) and it was fairly obvious that its time was limited. Fuji made nothing like it - Kodak made tungsten E-6 film in three speeds, Fuji made it in one. But EPJ was good while it lasted, and when it faded away without much publicity I missed it, but just increased my use of Portra 800 and NPZ (now renamed Pro 800Z) as well as 500T movie film.

    Similarly with the tungsten negative films for still cameras: gone from the catalogues of both manufacturers. Kodak's version, being the only tungsten negative still film available in 35 mm, was once again the biggest loss.

    I'm very surprised how long Kodak have kept Kodachrome in production (possibly not what I think Max thinks I think). Many of us expected it to be abandoned in the 90's, which was when the big switch to E-6 happened for most of us who had been using large quantities of Kodachrome. It's a great film, but it happens to be one that not many people want to use nowadays.

    Movie film is a different matter. There is some remarkable stuff available now. There are some relics as well - though Fuji and Ilford abandoned the B&W movie film market, Kodak hung in there with both negative and reversal films. Super 8 almost died, but then revived. Now Kodak have promoted it to a professional format, and they have expanded the range of films available.

    Scanning and digital post-processing have added to the potential uses of film, and freed it from some of its old constraints. For example, Kodak have produced two colour films that are unprintable by conventional means, but both remarkable for their time: Primetime in the 90's and HD Scan film now. Primetime was a bold move, and before its time - the idea of a film that was designed for scanning only was a bit radical. Fuji still haven't attempted it - I get the impression that they prefer safe bets.

    Exciting times for film users, exciting times for digital users.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  3. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    I love film because it is what I grew up with. I understand it and I have a ton of film cameras. It is as much economics as it is anything else. I can buy a lot of film for 2000 bucks every three years.

    I have the cameras and even if I didn't a good camera used these days can be had for twenty bucks. Good glass another thirty. Film couple of bucks a roll. 7200 dpi scanner was two hundred bucks and will probably never need replacing.

    When I shoot i don't shoot five hundred shots. I don't think it would help me to do so. So I have one thirty-six exposure roll to process. about three bucks.

    But I'm so limited you say. If there were only one way to do things in photography you would be right. However most of the things you do digitally we did for years with film so I dont feel limited I feel challenged.
     
  4. autumnlights

    autumnlights TPF Noob!

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    I love film for most of the already-posted reasons. No matter the quality of a digital image, the colours and textures always just seem so much better with film. It's how I learned photography, and I'm sure that if I'd been given a DSLR I wouldn't have learned nearly as much because it's just so easy to take hundreds of pictures. With film, you're so much more involved; you have to set everything manually (on my camera, at least) and you need to be aware of the amount of pictures you've taken. Then you either have to take it to be developed or do it yourself. It's a lot more hands-on then digital is, and the effort that you put into it makes you want to work on taking better and better pictures to make it worth it.
     
  5. indiephoto

    indiephoto TPF Noob!

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    I'm new to photography and have only ever shot digital but when I get more expierience I have full intents on learning to shoot and develop film
     
  6. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    I wonder what's become of the OP. Did he write his paper?
     
  7. TheGenericusername

    TheGenericusername TPF Noob!

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    i like film because its real, there isn't too much tweaking that can be done, what you see is what you get. Unlike digital where a crap photo can be a masterpiece because of photoshop, the same applies to the photographer.
     
  8. Battou

    Battou TPF junkie!

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    It's entirely possible he/she may be/have:

    1. Just sitting watching the replies and writing the paper

    2. Forgot about us

    3. Was just trying to stur something up and run

    4. Waiting for the last minute to eright the paper and off doing other things.
     
  9. Fate

    Fate TPF Noob!

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    My reasons for:

    1.) I love film grain at high iso.
    2.) I love being in the darkroom.

    My reason (only one :p) against:

    1.) It just doesn't cut it for spot news photos. Digital is the way forward for press photography.
     
  10. Rick Waldroup

    Rick Waldroup No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I was one of those guys that went kicking and screaming into the digital age.

    But I had to go digital, if I wanted to survive. I shoot a lot of PJ and event stuff, and to keep up, I had to switch to digital. And you know what? Once I did, I thought to myself, "Why was I making such a big fuss over this?"

    I had a darkroom at home for over 30 years and I worked in several darkrooms at major metropolitan newspapers across the country, and to tell you the truth- I don't miss film that much at all, or even working in the darkroom. And that astounded me because I thought I really, really would miss all that.

    The one thing I do miss is shooting film cameras, and in particular, rangefinders, but I really don't miss shooting film that much or working in my darkroom like I thought I would.

    And now, just to keep up in my PJ work, I expect to be shooting a lot of stuff with high-end digital video cameras, this coming year. And that is just what I need- another system to learn.:x
     
  11. Aquarium Dreams

    Aquarium Dreams TPF Noob!

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    Film "sings." Also, it dances the cancan *without pantaloons.*

    I like the way film looks, but probably the biggest reason for me is that I love cameras, and out of necessity, have to use film in vintage, pinhole, and plastic cameras.
     

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