With the regulations, is a drone even worth it?

Discussion in 'Aerial Photography' started by Destin, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. lynxear

    lynxear TPF Noob!

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    It is no different than losing control of your drone and crashing it.


     
  2. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I just did a short study for the yearbook advisor, cuz some of kids wanted a drone to take pictures. Yeah kids want their toys.
    Well the two major issues I found were:
    • I could not see a way that the intended school use was "hobby or recreational."
      • Which then leads to a MUCH more difficult set of FAA rules, which has a rule that the "pilot" has to be certified, which effectively means an adult, NOT a student.
    • Cannot fly over people. So they can't shoot school events. So what will they shoot, the empty school ?
    So I could not see a justification for the use of a drone for the school.
     
  3. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Yeah, there are a ton of rules. Honestly, I'm not sure I'd trust students with a drone anyway.

    That being said, it seems like almost every drone owner I know and follow online pretty much just blatantly disregards most of the rules with the exception of altitude. Until the FAA decides to make an example out of someone, it doesn't seem that they enforce much. I'm not encouraging breaking the rules, and I try my best to follow them. Just making an observation after my first 6-8 months of drone ownership.
     
  4. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Yes, agree with your point.
    The responsibility factor goes up significantly. And many high school kids can't handle it, as evidenced by the insurance rates for teen age male drivers.

    The problem is that there are too many drones out there for the FAA to crack down on. And they are easy and inexpensive to buy.
    But that will change when the first drone/aircraft collision happens where there are fatalities.
    Then the FAA will have to crack down on the industry and users. But congress won't change the laws and give the FAA the $$$ and authority, until a fatal collision happens, which is typical after the fact action.

    Problem is, they can't just disable/crash the drone, because it may cause injury when it crashes.
    The only mechanism that I can think of is for them to somehow take over control over the offending drone, and bring it down safely. And that has to be done without affecting the avionics of the aircraft in the area, which might be tough to do around an airport.
    I can see it now, anti-drone device emplacements around the airport, like AA batteries in WW-II.
    But the danger is in the entire landing and take off flight path, when the plane is low and slow. And that stretches for miles.

    As for flying drones, I agree with you.
    Breaking the rules is slowly asking for more rules and tougher rules.

    But like in California. When I come to a 4 way stop, I have to expect the other guy to not stop. Because odds are they won't stop. Even on a red light, people will continue through the red light. Not enough cops and traffic cameras to catch them.
     
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  5. HigherViews

    HigherViews TPF Noob!

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    Back to the original question, "Is it really as bad as it seems?" I don't think so, but each person must answer that for them self. I've had a UAV for almost 3 years and been certified under 14 CFR Part 107 for almost 2 years. There are more places to fly legally - commercial or not - than you might think, and there are apps that help you determine where it is safe to fly, in addition to your common sense. The bottom line for me is that I absolutely love the stunning video I can get with my DJI Phantom 4 Pro - I enjoy the whole process of flying and producing the video, and that makes it worth the 30-40 hours (and $150) I had to study for the cert test. At first I was nervous about spending a lot of money for a drone with a good camera, but I'm glad I did! For business or pleasure, learn the rules that apply to you, fly responsibly, and have fun!!
     
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