aperture settings for detailed foreground and background

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by lordson, Nov 9, 2007.

  1. lordson

    lordson TPF Noob!

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    hi guys,

    i was wondering what aperture setting would be adequate for a highly detailed background as well and a clear focused foreground

    would f11 do?

    i see alot of potraits with blurred backgrounds, but when on holiday you want the whole scene too

    at f11 i find the shutter speed is set a little low and the picture suffers from camera shake

    on a cloudy and semi-sunny day, what shutter speed would that equate to?

    cheers fellas
     
  2. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    At least f.11. Stop down as much as possible. I shoot some things at f.32 when I need tons of DOF.
     
  3. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well really that is pretty much the trick to photography in general isn't it?. For every picture you take you try to balance the right shutter speed/fstop/ISO combination to shoot your subject and accomplish your ultimate goal. Honestly noone can really tell you exactly what settings to use for your particular situation one way to speed up that shuter speed might be to up your ISO of course making increasing noise a problem.
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There is no standard answer to this, since it really depends on the scene and the perspective you want to picture it from.

    f/16 or f/22 will do it in many landscape shots from 50mm to wide angle.

    In some, f/8 will even do it. It really depends.

    It also depends on the medium (aps-c, 35mm, medium format, ... )

    just play and see :)
     
  5. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Actually, depending on the camera and location, anything between F/9 to whatever the limit of the lens is would all do about what you like. If you really want to try something, lookup and learn about "hyperfocal" and how it applies to your camera/lens.
     
  6. chris_arnet

    chris_arnet TPF Noob!

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    if its to shaky, get a tripod. Or a monopod if your going to be moving alot. I would say f/8 to f/9 would be fine if its holiday pics around the house, as long as you have a little distance between you and your subject. F/11 would be good. f/16 should be the very most you would need to stop down to.
     
  7. Buszaj

    Buszaj TPF Noob!

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    So would you use those kind of aperture values for landscapes?
     
  8. hamster

    hamster TPF Noob!

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    I use f/8 or 9 for most landscapes to prevent lens diffraction. I find it to be pretty sharp on my lenses, you may want to experiment with yours.
     
  9. lordson

    lordson TPF Noob!

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    hrm... thanks guys, i'm going to get a tripod soon.

    a Kodak Gear one, its only $20. and i'm going to get a Gorilla Tripod thing to keep in my pocket

    i'll just get it ass high as i can for landscapes, it tried f22 once and i didn't know what the shutter was going to do, it stayed open for about 10 seconds making this weird humming sound, i thought my camera just broke itself until the shutter came back down and i got a shaky ass image

    what would be a good f-stop for somehitng that is say 100m behind the subject? f8?
     
  10. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Be careful with cheap tripods and big cameras. A $20 tripod may be okay for a D40 with a small kit lens, but I wouldn't trust it for anything larger. I've had a tripod collapse under a camera before and it's not pretty.
     
  11. lordson

    lordson TPF Noob!

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    it says the max wieght is 2.5kgs

    and my camera is about 1.1kgs including lens
     

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