blackness on photos? help

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jaypee67, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. jaypee67

    jaypee67 TPF Noob!

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    I have no idea what this is.. its not my lense cause I tried other lenses, help me out.

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    1/200th is when the black starts showing up

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    and it shows up more as I increase the shutter

    I have no idea what this is.. its not my lense cause I tried other lenses, help me out.
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The black lines you are seeing are the blades of your shutter curtain as they are closing and I suspect that for each shot you get this effect you are using flash. Essentailly there is a limit as to how fast the shutter speed can be before you will get this effect when using flash as the dominant lighting source in a scene - generally around 1/200 to 1/250sec for many camera bodies.

    There are highspeed shutter modes on more advanced flash and lighting setups - but these will strip power from the flash - allowing the burst to be faster and reducing the chances of getting this blackband effect.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Just a follow up to what Overread had to say.

    If you can understand the following information, it can open up a whole new level of flash photography and camera operation understanding.

    In your camera's specifications, you'll find listed the "flash sync speed". For many of today's digital cameras about 1/200, 1/250 of a second.

    At that, and slower, shutter speeds both the front/first curtain has fully exposed the image sensor, and the rear/second curtains have not yet started to move to cover the image sensor (Nikon calls them front/rear, Canon calls the first/second).

    From your images, we can also see that your flash is sync'ed to the front/first curtain. The flash fires at the instant the front/first curtain is fully open.

    At faster shutter speeds, the rear/second curtain begins moving before the front/first curtain has fully opened, and partially blocks the image sensor when the flash fires at the instant the front/first curtain is fully open.

    Most digital SLR camera's can also be set to rear or second sync, meaning the flash fires at the instant the rear/second curtain begins to move, instead of when the front/first curtin is fully open.

    In that case, when the shutter is set to a speed shorter than the "flash sync speed" the black bands would be AT THE TOP OF THE IMAGE rather than at the bottom of the image.

    For most flash photography, you'll want the flash to sync on the rear/second curtain.

    You can see the front/first, rear/second curtains move, after the mirror raises out of the way, in this video.

    Imagine what the flash would be doing if the flash was set to sync with the front/first curtain, and then the rear/second curtain.

     
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