Burning SUV, Fire Department response

Discussion in 'Photojournalism & Sports Gallery' started by Roy Hubbard, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. Roy Hubbard

    Roy Hubbard TPF Noob!

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    I jumped off the bus when I saw a fire under the hood of this SUV last weekend. It wasn't very big when I got off, but it steadily grew and after a series of small explosions, it grew to engulf most of the vehicle. I checked with a man standing nearby whether 911 had been called, he said it had and I started shooting. The man seemed pretty distressed, my guess is that he was the driver but I can't say for sure. He walked off in a hurry after I spoke to him. No one was in the vehicle or was hurt during this incident.

    #1
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    #2
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    #3

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    #4
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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2010
  2. caged

    caged TPF Noob!

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    great shots.
    i like number 2.
     
  3. Roy Hubbard

    Roy Hubbard TPF Noob!

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    Thanks!
     
  4. PenguinPhotoWrx

    PenguinPhotoWrx TPF Noob!

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    Yup- #2 is the best shot of the group- you can really "feel the heat." Good job being a news photographer! I also like #4- the smoke blocks the distracting background as the firemen work. I'm sure the fire company that responded would love these on their web site (if they have one).

    I'm curious, because the exposure looks like it changed between 1 and 2... what settings were you using and were you consciously working on the exposure or just shooting in the "heat" of the moment?
     

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