Colored walls in a photo studio?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by JustJazzie, Nov 25, 2017.

  1. JustJazzie

    JustJazzie Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    We finally have the boys in their permeant quarters, which means my zen den is also settling into its ultimate resting place.

    The room doubles as a yoga/meditation space, and photo studio. I've decided to permanently work around my background stand in hopes that it inspires me to shoot more often, and I should be able to keep my lights on their stands in the closet for easy access.

    Currently, the walls are white, and the ceiling has wood planking (wouldn't want to change that!) I would LOVE to do like a smokey eggplant color. (okay, thats a lie, what I would really love to do is cover the walls with glitter, but DH said no way. So this is the next best thing.)

    I am wondering how much of a nightmare it will be to paint the walls this color, assuming I am not trying to bounce light and always plan to pull out my strobes and modifiers. Would using a matte paint instead of glossy help at all?

    The room is about 12.5x15 feet, if that is relevant in any aspect.

    Thank you for your thoughts,
    Jazzie


     
  2. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Having any color other white or gray in a photo studio will create a lot of work fixing color casts.
     
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  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Yep.
    My at home, extra room studio walls are painted a flat (no sheen) gray and the ceiling is a flat white.
     
  4. JustJazzie

    JustJazzie Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Could I do an accent wall BEHIND the backdrop? Or will that still cause issues?
     
  5. snowbear

    snowbear Big Furball Supporting Member

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    I wouldn't think that would be much of an issue, as long as the backdrop covers it and is thick enough to block it out.
     
  6. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The concern is colored reflections. As long as you don't have colored reflections, there will be no problem. Reflections can come from any direction. I recommend white or gray.
     
  7. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If you install curtain rods around the permitter of the room, you can hang black curtains to hide the walls.

    Ultimately you want to control reflections of light (even if the walls are color neutral). If you want colored walls, then you can hide them when you're working... and slide the curtains aside (or take them down) when not working.
     
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  8. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That was my thinking. You can even just have some type of hangers around the room, so that you can hang wall coverings when you want to use the room for photography. That way if the room is used more for other uses than photography. You can actually remove the fabric and store out of sight.
     

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