El Mirage Dry Lake

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by abraxas, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1.
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  2. lostprophet

    lostprophet No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    2 and 5 are winners
     
  3. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    For me it's 3 and 5 ... what is the bright stripe in 2? And 5 is my absolute winner of this series here.
    So does this lake ever have water at all?
     
  4. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The bright stripe in #2 is a bit of a dust storm settling down on the playa surface. It is called hardpan made up of very fine particles. The further toward the center of the lake, the less vegetation there is that grows and the finer the particles. Water binds these particles nearly as hard as concrete. So water does occasionally fill the lake. Since the surface is so flat and near level the larger, course materials (rock, then pebbles..) stop in the washes (dry creeks), sand near the edges (banks) and the little-tiny particles stay suspended in the now slow flowing water as it spreads out. There is no outlet to the lake, so when the water evaporates, the fine particles turn to mud and harden. At the deepest point the lake nearly ever exceeds a depth of about 4". At most dry lakes, sand dunes (low ones here, although I suspect inactive paleo-dunes exist as bajadas) form at the edges...

    ... I could go on. I love to over-explain. Most don't care to hear it, the grand-daughters are totally engaged (or very good actors).

    Summary: Thanks, Dust, Yes.
     
  5. Tantalus

    Tantalus TPF Noob!

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    I like 5's pattern and texture though I wish it has 3's horizon.
     
  6. JTHphoto

    JTHphoto TPF Noob!

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    awesome series, abrax, some of your best stuff yet. #5 is my favorite, i love the last (or is it first?) of the daylight you captured creating those long shadows. i like the horizon - perfectly flat - really gives the sense of a vast desert.

    off topic, these remind me of the movie "Holes"...
     
  7. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Cool. Thanks!

    'Holes' was filmed up at Cuddeback. I've been through there a few times but never stayed long. I couldn't bare the movie, I know too much about the lake formation where it was filmed to run with the story.
     
  8. Arch

    Arch Damn You! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    nice set... good work :thumbup:
     

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