First Senior Photos

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by DRoberts, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. DRoberts

    DRoberts TPF Noob!

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    C&C always welcome...

    #1
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    #2
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    #3
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    #4
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  2. dtornabene1

    dtornabene1 TPF Noob!

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    O.K., I don't have a lot of time, but here is goes. Photo one is lacking contrast. You have a white background, but the subject's face is washed out.

    Put a light behind the subject to make the background stand out from the subject. Also, try changing the WB (white balance) to expose some of the color that has been clipped. Then change to B/W (black and white).

    In number two, your subject is standing too much towards the camera and it makes his frame look enlarged. With a larger build, have the shoulder turned more so you get a sliming effect.

    The biggest and most import thing in number three are the shadows on the face. Turn on the flash. Brighten up the subject(s) in portrait photography by added flash, more so outdoors than in. If you used flash, it is not high enough. I like to start at -1.0 E.V. and work from there.

    I like number four, but I might have gone with a higher aperture. 5.6 is a good all-around setting for capturing people and leaving a lot in focus. Here you choose to shoot using 4.6.

    I would open it up to 2.8 and really focus on their faces. You could get away with this because the subjects' faces are the same distance from the camera as his head is resting on hers.

    Remember to include your specifications when posting. I had to look at the EXIF data to get photo data. Even if you have gear in your signature, we can't tell what each photo was shot at or with what, we can just guess. Or, if you are crazy like me, download the photo and analyze the EXIF data.

    The good news is your subjects seem comfortable with you. This is especially hard with teenagers. They are very self-conscious and do not like to open up as a rule. You obviously put them at ease. That's is something that can not be taught like as the technical stuff can.

    Great Job!

    -Nick
     
  3. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    I think the first two need more directional lighting.



    This isn't really directed towards just you, but for anyone who sees the first two pictures and thinks the lighting is okay:



    There is rarely anything interesting about flat, even lighting. I honestly do not understand why people aspire to set their lights 45 degrees on each side of the subject. When used in a "safe" and rudimentary way, even light has little character, hardly any depth, and above all essentially acts as a fancy, soft xerox of your subject.


    I fear there was so much potential with the cowboy theme, i mean c'mon, it's so iconic, how does it not get you excited about trying some more dangerous lighting?!?!?!?

    look at the front page of this, now that's what i'm talking about.

    http://www.strobist.blogspot.com/
     
  4. dtornabene1

    dtornabene1 TPF Noob!

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    Droberts,

    Did you read mine or Sw1tchFX's comments? Do you agree or did you find them helpful? Just wondering.

    -Nick
     

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