Histogram

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by RedDevilUK, May 22, 2007.

  1. RedDevilUK

    RedDevilUK TPF Noob!

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    can someone explain how to use the histogram please....

    i thought it was just a case of keeping the peaks in the centre? but the other night i took some night shots of the clock tower and town hall, which were all lit up nicely :)

    i selected manual and though i would take advantage of the lighting... so with camera on tripod choose a 10 second long exp 18mm f22 ISO 1250

    on the LCD the pictures looked awesome!! i was really impressed :D

    untill i got home and saw them on the PC :(

    they all looked awful

    using the histogram must eliminate this??? does it
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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  3. deadtoaster2

    deadtoaster2 TPF Noob!

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    thanks for the link, I was wondering the same thing!
     
  4. RedDevilUK

    RedDevilUK TPF Noob!

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    yea, made interesting reading... especially the sub link to the "expose to the right"

    i am going to shoot a couple of pics now... and post my findings :)
     
  5. RedDevilUK

    RedDevilUK TPF Noob!

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    OK, shooting direct images with this in mind works.... but there are some exceptions, including Landscape shots lik i just tried.

    so its either the Photoshop mege of 2 pictures?? i have never tried that, or buy a graduation filter.
     
  6. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    A histogram is great, and knowing how to interpret it is vital, but it's no substitute for knowing how to expose in different situations. Shooting at night is tough, often unpredictable, and often requires bracketing.
     
  7. bakuretsu

    bakuretsu TPF Noob!

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    A common misconception is that a histogram should always be tall in the middle and shorter on the sides. That is true for many daytime photographs, but the histogram will look different depending on your shooting situation. You must learn how to read it to know what it "should" look like.

    This article has a lot of nice illustrations and describes in detail the way a histogram is actually calculated: http://www.singleservingphoto.com/2007/06/03/histograms-huh/
     
  8. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    A histogram shows what an image is, and can not be used to show what an image should look like. Obviously a photo taken of the city at night, or the stars will be heavily balanced to the left (dark) areas. A high key portrait may show some severe white clipping on the histogram, probably done on purpose.
     

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