How to photograph a smoke??

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by emo, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. emo

    emo TPF Noob!

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    hello, can some guide on how can i take a good picture of subjects with smoke?? because i've been trying it but the smoke didn't came out in the picture.. i try ciggar shots but the smoke is too thin in the pic.. what should i take note of? the light, background etc.?? thanks in advance...
     
  2. redneckdan

    redneckdan TPF Noob!

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    i'm not really an expert, probably not even an amateur yet; I would imagine the best way to do it would be with a dark black background and a fill flash. I know blue light cuts through smoke (learned that in SAR training) so I would avoid anything to do with blue light.
     
  3. bobaab

    bobaab TPF Noob!

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    With post editing, you can bring out smoke or clouds really well using contrast and color balance...taking a good picture tho, I don't know.
     
  4. cjoe

    cjoe TPF Noob!

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    yep. I mean any light will, i'm guessing a fairly harsh directional light will do the trick. But its always good to experiment, (unless you're shooting 6x7, and you're paying :D )
     
  5. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Use joss-sticks instead of cigarettes and cigars - they have a denser smoke and hang round for longer. Make sure the lighting is perpendicular (at 90deg) to the subject and you should be able to capture a person or thing in the smoke.

    Avoid flash or any lighting behind the camera as this will give a wall of grey. It's important that the smoke is only around the subject, as opposed to filling the room with it, as out of the depth of field, it'll either disappear or look odd.

    Rob
     

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