I could use some lighting help

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by amyliz, Aug 25, 2004.

  1. amyliz

    amyliz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2004
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am setting up a small studio in an extra bedroom in my home. I will mostly be doing shots of babies and little kids - probably no more than 1-2 at a time. I don't have the funds, the room or the experience to have a ton of lights. The type of portriats that I love to take are much more candid that posed. I don't plan on using much in the way of props or backgrouns - pretty simple black/white.

    I have been doing a ton of reading and I just don't know the best way to go. Do I want to go for an umbrella set up or a soft box set up? The kids will not be sitting in one place so I need a fairly forgiving lighting setup.

    The room does have a window, but it doesn't get great light so I am thinking it is best just to pretend it isn't there.

    Do I just go for a main light and a fill light? And if so, what is the best/most economical way to do this?

    Is strobe lighting or continuous lighting the way to go with this?

    Could I ask any more questions?! :D

    I appreciate any advice!
     
  2. SWFLA1

    SWFLA1 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1
    Remember - if the lighting is good, you can take a good portrait... the camera simply records the light.

    I would stay with strobes for two reasons:
    1. continous lighting has a tendency to get very warm
    2. you can use the strobe to entertain and get the babies attention

    I love soft boxes, but on a limited budget in a small room i would use umbrellas (are the walls white?)

    Ideally, you would have a minimum of your main, a fill, and background light... even a hair light for the children with black or dark hair. You can get away with less powerful (and less expensive) background and hair lights...

    Under some real budget constraints, you can get away with a main and bounce the light all over the walls if they are white...or use reflectors...

    This is all kind of a generalization, but i hope it helps a little...
     
  3. amyliz

    amyliz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2004
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    The walls are light pinkish, but I plan on painting them before I set stuff up in there. The walls currently have a fairly glossy paint on them, I expect that glossy-ish paint would aid in bouncing light off the walls. True?

    Thanks for your thoughts on this. It does help.
     
  4. rangefinder

    rangefinder TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Texas
    I would think that glossy paint may give you hot spots. I think falt/matte finish, though it wouldn't reflect as much light, would have a better chance of being more even.
     
  5. SWFLA1

    SWFLA1 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    1
    I agree with rangefinder - you will get hotspots with glossy paint. try a flat or satin finish. Remember though - you're walls will show up as gray if your exposure isn't white balanced. Shoot a roll using a doll or "model" for test so you can analyze the lighting...

    Good Luck!! Sounds like you're in for some fun!
     

Share This Page