indoor design/architecture shots

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by JTHphoto, Dec 7, 2005.

  1. JTHphoto

    JTHphoto TPF Noob!

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    I am looking for pointers and tips for taking photos of flooring inside residential/commercial locations. My father-in-law installs hardwood floors and we may take some photos of his work for a website or brochures. I'm thinking of some nice shots with the floor as the focal point, but including the room as a whole. I've glanced through some magazines and feel i may be a little out of my league, any suggestions?

    Lenses?
    I have the 20D with 17-85 is. Is this wide enough?

    Elevation?
    shoot from eye level, low to floor, or try to elevate?

    Lighting?
    i'm sure this will be the biggest challenge, shut all window blinds and turn on lights? do i need filters to alter lighting? flash is pretty much useless for this kind of photography right?

    i'm appreciative for any advice y'all may have.
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Elevate - about 6' is good. Your aim is to try and show the floor so that's what you do.
    As for lighting... It all depends upon the location, situation and floor.
    It's not something you can teach in 5 minutes and there are no short cuts or quick fixes if you want to do it like the pro's.
     
  3. photoboy15

    photoboy15 TPF Noob!

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    The days when I was assisting a acrh photographer we would shoot al night to avoid sunlight. We would shoot multiple exposure to combine light colors for a pleasing picture. Then morning comes for the last shot with that morning light and off to bed. It was fun but Im sure glad it not my living. Ohh yea you had some questions. Well shoot from the point of view that is more appealing to you product. Since your product is the floor, I like to be at 3-4' like someone bending down to get a better look. You dont want to shoot to wide because you can distort the image. Look through the lens at 35 and then 50 etc and see what looks the best. Remember more is not always better, so picking a section might be the best idea. Try to make any backgroung slightly out of focus so they dont draw attention. Most important use that digital to you have somrthing that looks like what you want.
     
  4. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    well I did a bit of indoor arcgitecture photography for pubs and clubs here. of course I had to show everything from the best side. The best pictures were panoramical, even with a slight barrel distortion but they just showed everything and the room looked bigger that it really is.

    And try to use as much natural light as possible... I'd do so...
     
  5. JTHphoto

    JTHphoto TPF Noob!

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    thank for the suggestions :thumbup:
     
  6. jdvmi

    jdvmi TPF Noob!

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    What about a tilt & shift lens.. would that type of lens help him?
     

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