Liquid light projector - focus puzzle...

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by sharonak, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. sharonak

    sharonak TPF Noob!

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    Hello all,

    Long time reader, first time poster. Be gentle.....

    SO, I'm using a slide projector (leica/colorman) to print larger images onto plywood using liquid light, and there's a puzzle here: they look absolutely pin-sharp during exposure (ie from the projector), but on developing and fixing, the results are very soft - fuzzy - out-of-focus, in fact.

    Any ideas what could cause this? Driving me crazy:confused:

    Sharona
     
  2. compur

    compur No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    From time to time I have heard of people trying this -- using a projector as
    an enlarger. Your results are consistent with what I've heard and read of
    others' attempts. Projectors make lousy enlargers apparently.

    I would suggest getting a real enlarger with a real enlarging lens. They can
    be quite cheap these days. My Beseler 23C can tilt up and "project"
    horizontally if that is something you need. Some others can as well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2010
  3. c.cloudwalker

    c.cloudwalker TPF Noob!

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    +1
     
  4. AnaBo

    AnaBo TPF Noob!

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    you could try using a cheap holga enlarger it sells for around 100$

    one question for my knowledge, do you apply the liquid light straight to the plywood or prime it first?
     
  5. Allen

    Allen TPF Noob!

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    It depends on how large you are trying to project.
    Liquid light is not the fastest emulsion and an enlarger can't put out enough light if you have to place the printing surface very far away from the head.

    The brighter light of the projector can sometimes be the better option.

    That said, how are you stopping down your projector? There may be issues with the aperture. Also making mural sized prints you are going to notice the grain of the film more.
     
  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Is the slide "popping" during the exposure as it heats up? A cold slide will be at one focus point, and then the slide will heat up and "snap!" into focus as the film warms up...so...if the slides are in paper or plastic mounts,and not glass mounted, there will be a proper focus for a cold slide,and a hot one.

    I dunno...I did not think slide projector lenses were sharp enough to make high-grade enlargements from.
     
  7. Allen

    Allen TPF Noob!

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    I made a few 6 foot prints onto tissue paper with liquid light and my 23C just didn't have the candle power to make a good image. My projector (a Leica like the OP's) did a passable job.

    And an extreme enlargement with an emulsion that has brush strokes, on an odd medium such as plywood, you are only going to get so sharp.
     
  8. emilyr

    emilyr TPF Noob!

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    How did you develop the image on tissue paper? I've heard using a spray bottle on water colour paper works, but I can't imagine that would work on tissue paper.
     
  9. Allen

    Allen TPF Noob!

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    I used silkspan tissue. It's used by model airplane guys and taxidermists of all things.
    The texture is similar to what a new shirt is wrapped in, but there are silk fibers embedded in it so it does not fall apart when wet.

    I stretch two sheets across a frame and glue it in place. For my 6 foot prints I used metal frames and for smaller prints I use the same frames a painter uses to stretch a canvas.

    I put it on wet and the silkspan shrinks when it dries and removes any wrinkles. Once it's coated with liquid light it will strum like a drum when dry.

    I have a very large developing sink. I apply the developer and fixer with spray bottles.
     
  10. TonyAlec

    TonyAlec TPF Noob!

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    Does anyone have any examples of photos they've made using this technique?
     
  11. snphoto

    snphoto TPF Noob!

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    Hi there...

    I'm new here too, :)

    ...this wasn't the original question, however, my personal preference is for Luminos liquid emulsion as apposed to liquid light. I don't work with alternative processes anymore myself, and certainly not Luminos LE, since they stopped making it, however a friend of mine has had a stash she's been taking care of but doesn't need it anymore. it's up on ebay now, if anyone's interested.

    Thanks,
    snphoto
     

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