OK brand new to portraits pls help me make these better

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by eerieknight, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. eerieknight

    eerieknight TPF Noob!

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    Ok, i just got my Nikon D70s and a Alien Bee lighing kit with two B800's
    my intent is to set up a home studio to do photos for peeps to start the build of my buisness .....but am struggling at this a bit an wanting to get some help to make my photos better.... not this group was taken with a lot of time to get the kids right lighting does not seem exactly right so looking for advice to make it better... i set eact light at 45 degrees off center with my main falash having the reflective umbrella set at 1/2th power about 5 foot off the subject and my fill having the shoot through umbrella , set at 1/4 power with my subject again about 5 foot away from the light.now i have these posted on web shots as i dont have a site yet or a place to put my pics
    this is the link and the newest ones are http://community.webshots.com/myphotos?action=viewAllPhotos&albumID=548907702&security=Yndwjc
    pls help me make them better open to any thing be brutal
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm putting this thread in the portraits forum so you can get better feedback on your gear, and advice for your images. :)
     
  3. eerieknight

    eerieknight TPF Noob!

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    thanks for the move i should have read down further before i posted hehehe
     
  4. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    It's good 'Picture People' style lighting--very flat and very even. There's almost no shadow definition, and the camera and subject are always facing straight at each other.
     

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