Photographing Thanksgiving Fun in the Home - Advice?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by astrostu, Nov 19, 2006.

  1. astrostu

    astrostu Guest

    I've been doing candids of my family Thanksgiving dinner for fun for the past few years, but none of them ever turn out in a way that I think represents the day/dinner/people. I usually do some shots in the kitchen, of the table before people sit, and of dessert being served (just 'cause that's when I'm up and have access to my camera when there's no food around).

    I'm curious to know if any of you (U.S.-ians) have successfully documented your own Thanksgiving dinner, and could offer any tips?
     
  2. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

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    What? No Canadians can give advice? ;)

    Well, from limited experience, I would highly recommend a fast lens. (Ie. 50mm f/1.8) It is extremely versatile, and makes it easier to capture those 'split' second moments without a blaring flash interupting dinner and people ending up grumbling whenever you pick up your camera. The downside is that with the 350D, it is rather 'zoomed' (for lack of a better term in my head), so I wouldn't defintely suggest brinign your 18-55mm for full table shots.
    One thing that always looks great, is to capture those small details, like the toppings on dishes and such with a large aperture. When you show those interspersed with your other 'people' photos from the day, it really has people going "oh wow, I never noticed that" and brings the whole atmosphere together.

    Have fun with it :)
     
  3. cosmonaut

    cosmonaut No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think I would try a 28-80mm zoom. Use a bounce flash from about six to ten feet. Set your flash to manual add two stops lower aperature to make up for the light loss on the bounce. This keeps your subject at a comfotable distance and doesn't give them that white flash face from a close distance. You will also get more candid shots if you don't crowd your subjects....
    Cosmo
     

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