photography questions

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by jenny6165, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. jenny6165

    jenny6165 TPF Noob!

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    Hi there, im new to this site, my name is Jenny.
    im currently at college studying btech national diploma in photography.

    Basically, one of our projects at the moment is Still Life, which we are shooting on a medium format camera in a studio.

    I need to do some research and dont have access to some books at the moment, so any help with some questions i have would be great.

    firstly, what is a medium format camera. I know, it holds a 120 film. But additional info would be good as i have to write it up.
    Also, i need some info on push and pull exposure and processing.

    OH and also!!! sorry! For the still life project we have to use three objects, a transparent/translucent, a textured and a reflective item. I have chosen a shiny razor, a see through aftershave bottle and one of those hairy aftershave brushes, so any tips on composition and stuff would be nice as i need to start planning it
     
  2. mygrain

    mygrain Friend to nose goblins everywhere

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    try this...http://medfmt.8k.com/ This is a great site to learn about MF cameras. Good luck on yer project!! If ya need advice take a few shots and post them in the photo thread. We'd be glad to shed some light or help.
     
  3. tmpadmin

    tmpadmin TPF Noob!

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    Not bad for push/pull http://www3.telus.net/drkrm/push-pull.htm

    Like Mygrain said, snap a few photos and post them, you'll got a ton of good / bad comments to help you improve your photo.

    Welcome - hope you become a regular. You can learn a lot from everyone here, plus we're a fun bunch :)
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    You nailed it. These days a medium format camera is a camera that uses 120 or 220 size film. 220 film is just like 120, except the roll is twice as long, and it doesn't have the light proof paper backing (it was eliminated to get the film to fit on the reel). Most medium format cameras shoot images frames that are 6x4.5cm, 6x6cm, 6x7cm, 6x9cm, 6x12cm, or 6x17cm. Some cameras can handle multiple image sizes: Hasselblads can do 6x4.5 or 6x6. Some folders will do 6x6 and 6x9. There used to be other sizes of film available that would have been considered medium format, such as 620 and even sheet film, but they are hard to find.

    No one really uses the term "small format", but 35mm film and 16mm film (110 size) fall into this category. APS is like 25mm film, or something around that size.

    Large format film is considered to start at 4"x5" image frames, and goes up to 8"x10". Usually it comes in sheets of 4x5, 5x7, or 8x10, but there are some folks are using custom sizes or even big roll film.

    Ultra large format is over 8"x10". Some folks are shooting 20"x24" cameras! That camera will barely fit in your car.

    Medium format cameras come in many designs: SLR, TLR, folding cameras, plastic "toy" cameras, view cameras, rangefinders, and you can get medium format film backs that allow you to use medium format roll film with a large format view camera.
     
  5. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    Does that mean cameras which say to use 120 can take 220 as well? Or just some?
     
  6. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    I think, judging by the qualities of the materials they have asked you to use, they are trying to get you to look at lighting. Or that's what you should be doing.
    The three types of object really need three seperate approaches to lighting.
    Translucent objects are best backlit. Lighting from the top or front will kill their qualities and put ugly specular highlights in.
    Shiny objects are best with a light tent or similar effect. Unless care is taken you will see you, the camera and the whole studio reflected therein.
    Texture needs a softish, slightly oblique light to pull out the texture. This light is just what you don't need for the other two.
    Best approach is to backlight the translucent object - bounce the light off a white background and position the objects in front. Use card, foil and mirrors to reflect light in to define the other objects. Perhaps use a snoot as a key light for the brush to pick out the texture.
    Arrange the objects to make best use of the light and minimise unwanted reflections. The composition will take care of itself.
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Some cameras can take either; some only take 120. A Pentax 6x7 can handle either by just hitting a switch. A Hassy, and I assume most other modular MF SLRs, have different film backs for the different size rolls. Most vintage cameras can only do 120. If it has a little red window on the back it can only do 120, because 220 doesn't have the light proof paper backing to the roll. My Rolleiflex can do 120 or 35mm, but there were special Rolleis made that can handle 120, 220, and 35mm.
     
  8. ferny

    ferny TPF Noob!

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    Thanks ksmattfish. :)
     

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