Portfolio question

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by ShutterBug357, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. ShutterBug357

    ShutterBug357 TPF Noob!

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    I'm a college student looking to put together my first portfolio. I've looked at different university and professional websites, but I'd like some additional information.

    Such as: how many photos? landscapes? portraits?

    I'm not sure what exactly I'm looking to do with my photography, but I've found that I tend to lead toward natural and still life black and white photos.

    Any advice or information would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I would make it no more than ten images; (your absolute best work, which you have PPd very carefully) printed to 8x10 and mounted in a high-quality presentation type book (available from art supply stores). Underneath each print, I'd have a quick little bio, what, where, when. I'd also mimic it on a CD-ROM so that you can provide it in electronic format if required.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I agree.
    Consider than while you want to think of your portfolio in terms of the best images...others might use the worst images to form their opinion. So only use the best of the best.

    Also, consider being able to change out and customize your portfolio for different purposes. You don't want to use landscape shots to apply for a portrait shooting job.
    Choose shots that show that you can control the camera...shallow DOF, deep DOF, frozen motion or controlled blur etc.
     

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