Rebel XT kit question

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Sqiud, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. Sqiud

    Sqiud TPF Noob!

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    I'm getting my first camera(rebel xt), used, (friend of a friend thing,) and it'll come with the 18-55mm kit lens. Will this do what I need, or will I have to buy a new lens or two?

    I want to be able to photograph my artwork - I paint a lot, mostly canvases sized 16"x20" to 22"x28", but also larger occasionally. I want to be to shoot nice, accurate photos of my artwork.

    I also want to experiment with photography of course, and work on composition and such. I find myself taking pictures of things anywhere from 5-10-50 feet away when I am out with my boring point and shoot.

    So could the 18-55mm do this well?
     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    The 18-55 kit lens will be able to shoot a lot of photos for you. I happen to own the second US-market 18-55 kit lens model, the II version,the non-USM pre-IS version, and it is somewhat craptastic on an 8.2 MP 20D. The reviewers all pounced on how bad it the Mark I non-USM was, and how bad it performed compared to the kit zooms of other manufacturers.

    Most XT's were sold with the Mark II lens, which was a slight improvement over the earlier version, and less prone to horrible color fringing, but the Mark II while a bit better, was definitely not a *good lens*. I have an 18-55 EF-S 3.5~5.6 II, and it is a disappointing performer overall.

    See Canon EOS 350D / Digital Rebel XT Review: 20. Photographic tests: Digital Photography Review for a comparison of the I and the II lenses, where they fault the Mark II as being,
    "disappointing with noticeable softness and ghosting" when shot at telephoto settings and smaller apertures,so even though the Mark II got rid of the dreadful purple color fringing of the earlier version, it is STILL a lens that has quite a bit of problems,and earned a poor reputation.

    After the furor over the initial two versions's poor image quality, high chromatic aberration, and sloppy mechanical quality, a version with Image Stabilizer was introduced to compete with the Nikon 18-55 VR model which was actually a pretty decent optical performer. The 18-55 kit lens was a poorly-handled project for Canon. The original 300D had a USM or ultrasonic motor version on the Japanese domestic market kits, while the USA models were non-USM! All in all, a botched deal with the early Rebels and their kit lenses, with the Japanese market getting the better USM models and the rest of the world getting,well, you know...
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2009
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Should be fine :)
    (especially if you use a tripod and set the aperture to F8 or F11)
     
  4. JustAnEngineer

    JustAnEngineer TPF Noob!

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    Shoot a thousand photos with the kit lens, and you'll get an idea of which limitations bother you and which don't. That will help you decide which other lenses (if any) interest you.

    The EF 50mm f/1.8 is frequently suggested as a second lens, since it gives you wide aperture and better image quality than the kit lens for less than $100. It is limited to a fixed 50mm, which may be too long for some of your indoor uses. A decent bounceable flash like the $250 Speedlite 430EX II might find its way onto your wish list, too.
     
  5. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    yes, the camera and lens can do the job but you'll soon find that you will need supplimental lighting and the knowledge of how to set it up.

    I recommend getting the book Light: Science and Magic. An Introduction to Photographic Lighting. By Fil Hunter.
     
  6. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
     
  7. Renol

    Renol TPF Noob!

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    The kit lens is a good starter. It took me a couple thousand shots before I really was itching for an upgrade. The 50mm is also a good additional lens to get, if for nothing else the wonderful big aperture. The f/1.8 version is the cheap and easy way to go and the f/1.4 version is even better. Which one you choose is a matter of how much you want to spend and how serious you want to be.
     

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