saving direct to computer

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by newtonm, Oct 7, 2005.

  1. newtonm

    newtonm TPF Noob!

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    We want to be able to take single shots (of CD Album covers) save them individually to a computer and name them using a barcode reader so that the picture becomes, for example 028946278222.jpg. The set up needs to somewhat like a rostrum so that it is quick and easy with a minimum of key strokes. Application is for use on an e-commerce site for a small chain of CD stores here in Canada. ( http://www.grigorian.com )
    Not sure if there is a digital camera that allows individual naming of shots or whether we have to re-name as shot is saved. Any suggestions re hardware (camera, interface etc) OR software would be appreciated. BTW scanning is too slow!!

    TIA Richard Myers
    Newton Myers Consultants - Burlington - Ontario - Canada
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    It is likely that this would infringe on the copyright of the album art work, even if storing it as a description of a product for internal use only. I would suggest checking local law before embarking on this project.

    Your question is really an IT one, not a photography or imaging one as you seem to have identified the two areas you need help with:

    1. Speed of scanning - the answer is to look for the fastest scanner you can afford or to use a digital camera. Is speed or image quality the most important thing?

    2. Automatic file naming from barcode input - most barcode readers work as keyboards, emulating the rapid typing in of the numbers contained in the pattern. I would suggest that you get a schoolkid to write you a routine which displays the picture and presents a prompt - then you scan the barcode and it automatically renames it to 0216846464.jpg or whatever and you can link the image within the database. Or you could go the cheapo route and use something like Picasa, click the image, press F2 to rename and then hit the barcode scanner and hey-presto.

    Rob
     
  3. Marctwo

    Marctwo TPF Noob!

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    There'll be no copyright issues with showing a picture of the product you're selling. ;)
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Glad you're an expert on Canadian copyright law :p

    You're almost certainly right though, I thought it was worth pointing out though as there's been so much unreasonableness lately over IP and copyright, especially in the music industry! Wouldn't want anyone to get a visit from the thought police!

    Rob
     
  5. Marctwo

    Marctwo TPF Noob!

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    Try selling permissions to a record company and tell them that your picture can't be used to advertise the album that it's used on. :biglaugh:
     
  6. newtonm

    newtonm TPF Noob!

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    As our client is a major Canadian CD retailer they have total permission to use any cover art from ALL the major distributors so this is not an issue. We even have access to their FTP b to b sites for downloading images, unfortunately most of these sites are too slow, innaccurate or just plain "dodgy"
     
  7. newtonm

    newtonm TPF Noob!

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    I like the sound of the Picasa method, I will experiment with this.

    Re quality vs speed of scanning, bit of both really but probably speed and convenience are the major issues. Final jpegs are only 110 x 110 so quality is not so vital.
     
  8. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Major retailers generally value their staff time enough to invest some $ on getting something working efficiently - perhaps you need to analyse your requirements from end result back to design rather than fudging together a solution using inappropriate freeware? Oh hang on, that was my suggestion - DOH!

    My suggestions were based upon doing say a couple of thousand CD's for a local shop; not introducing a new classification method for every album coming out for a national retailer. It would be a half-baked solution to use a barcode scanner and picasa to try and work through the backlog and to inventory every released CD. There's bound to be a better way I would think. How do people like iTunes get their album art I wonder?

    Ho-hum, far too much like IT work for this forum me thinks.

    Good luck with your project.

    Rob
     

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