Snowy tower

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by JonathanM, Mar 4, 2006.

  1. JonathanM

    JonathanM TPF Noob!

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    These are photos of a place called Rivington Pike, in north west england. Taken saturday, about 9.00am GMT.
     
  2. JohnMF

    JohnMF TPF Noob!

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    they look nice, if a bit small
     
  3. Corry

    Corry Flirtacious and Bodacious Supporting Member

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    Yup, I agree, they're a bit too small to give much comment. :)
     
  4. aprilraven

    aprilraven TPF Noob!

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    very formidable place, it looks like...whats the back ground on this castle???

    i think you did a fine job... love the snow...
     
  5. ClarkKent

    ClarkKent TPF Noob!

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    They could be a bit bigger. But from the looks of the second one...that looks to be a good capture.
     
  6. JonathanM

    JonathanM TPF Noob!

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    the history is relatively short actually, it is part of an area of land owned by the Lever family, and at its peak it was an extensive area of gardens. Now it is more of a country park, but all of the architecture was simply built as "follies", i.e. no structural purpose.

    The Pike itself was used as a "beacon" hill during olden times (1400's or so) as were most highish hills across the UK.
     

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