Tamrom 60mm f2 macro vs Tamron 90mm f2.8 macro

Discussion in 'Canon' started by mangtarn, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. mangtarn
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    mangtarn New Member

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    Hello folks, here's the problem.
    I came across the above two lenses and i can get either of them for around 200 bucks. The 60mm is specialized for APS-C sensors whereas the 90mm is made for full frames (of course it would still work on crop sensors). I looked on the internet and I found some pretty impressive results with the 90mm, however there weren't much information on the 60mm lens. I have a crop body camera and I would like to use lens for macro as well as some portrait. Now I was wondering which focal length would serve me better?

    Thanks folks!
  2. pgriz
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    pgriz Well-Known Member

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    How close do you want to get to your subject? The longer focal length allows you to achieve 1:1 magnification with a bit more space between the lens and the subject. The other consideration is that the 90mm has no limitations as far as the type of camera it goes on, while the 60mm does. My own approach would be to choose equipment that allows me to keep more options open.

    As for the performance of the 90mm, I have it, use it on a crop camera, and it performs superbly.
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  3. Dao
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    Dao Well-Known Member

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    - If I am planning to shoot insects and like to get 1:1 macro ratio, 90mm. (Longer focal length => don't need to get too close to subject)
    - If they both cost $200 and same condition, 90mm (90mm macro for $200 is a great price. Of course, it depends on conditions and whether it is a manual lens or not. Manual, I mean do I need to set the aperture on the lens and has no communication with the camera body) (Note: If the 90mm Tamron is a AF lens and works with the newer DSLR body, go get it even you don't need it. $200 is cheap. If you turn around and sell it back for $250, it should be gone in seconds)
    - If I want to also use for indoor portrait type photos, 60mm (shorter focal lenght for tighter space)
    - No need to worry when upgrade to full frame body. 90mm.
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  4. Nikon_Josh
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    Nikon_Josh New Member

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    Both answers here are Bang on the money.

    I lov emy 90mm as it gives me a decent working distance for macro work, it really is an amazing lens in every sense of the word. I sometimes want longer than 90mm though for Macro, so I would 60mm limiting.

    If you want the best portrait/macro combo, get a Sigma 50 1.4 and a Tamron 90 2.8. OK it's more expensive this way, but it's the perfect combo. A 1.4 Aperture will come in very handy when shooting people if you want to get creative.
  5. cgipson1
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    cgipson1 New Member

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    Go with the 90mm.. the short focal length on the 60 will severely limit you in some areas.. like lighting a subject! It also spooks the critters you may want to shoot more than the 90 would.
  6. Dao
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    Dao Well-Known Member

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    You know, sometimes I wish the focal length of my 100mm macro lens is longer. Especially when the subject is a bee or wasp. Got couple scary moment in the past.

    Aiming at the bee through the viewfinder => Bee disappear in the viewfinder => Bee flying noise next to my ear. => ....
  7. cgipson1
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    cgipson1 New Member

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    Sigma 150 or 180.. or Nikon 200! Sweet lenses all.. and you can find the older Sigmas sometimes for a steal! ;)
  8. jriepe
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    jriepe New Member

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    Normally a longer focal length equals a greater minimum focusing distance with more room to work but I don't believe that would be the case comparing the Tamron 60mm to the Tamron 90mm. Minimum focusing distance is measured from the focal plane mark on the camera body. Now let's assume the focal plane mark is right at the point where the lens connects to the camera. It isn't but it makes the calculations simpler. The 60mm lens is internal focusing with a length of 3.1 inches and a minimum focusing distance of 9.1 inches. 9.1 inches minus 3.1 inches equals 6 inches which would be the distance from the front of the lens to the subject at the 1:1 ratio. The 90mm lens is not internal focusing and is 6 inches in length zoomed out to the 1:1 ratio. The minimum focusing distance is 11.4 inches and 11.4 minus 6 equals 5.4 inches. So with the 60mm lens you would have approximately one half inch extra distance to work with. For either lens to get the true distance from front of lens to subject you would have to subtract the distance from the focal plane to the back of the lens.

    I have the 90mm and it is a great lens but for insects and nearly all my other macro work I use my 180mm Tamron.

    Jerry
  9. thedigitalpro
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    thedigitalpro New Member

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    I would like to + the 90 lens. I use this at my weddings for serious close ups and it's brilliant. My in-law also uses it for flowers etc. Really really happy with it.

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