Tripod for a big camera 5d mark 3

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by ph0toe, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. ph0toe

    ph0toe TPF Noob!

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    i'm looking to invest in a quality tripod that'll last me quite a few years so I'll be able to spend a decent amount on one. I need a sturdy one that can hold a big camera like a camera 5d mark 3. I may throw in some big lenses when I shoot still images or make cinematic videos. I don't know much about tripod but i heard gitzo is one of the top brands that make decent tripods.


    I'll like to obviously buy a tripod that meets only my needs, I don't really the extra functions. I just need it to be able to take body shots for when I post outfit photos on instagram. I'll also need one that can tilt and be still at the same time for when I make videos and talking in front of the camera.

    lightweight and compact would be ideal for when I need to bring it around for travels and taking it to shoot nature, etc.


    any links, advice would be great! thanks!


     
  2. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I own 4 Manfrottos and 1 chinese copy. They have all done well. Even the chinese copy of my Carbon One is still going strong. I also have 2 Manfrotto monopods. Several of the Manfrottos are nearly 20 years old now. One was purchased / used for a Large Format monorail camera. 2 of the tripods I have are carbon fiber so little lighter but pretty strong. The larger aluminum ones are heavier, but hold lots of weight, and sturdy.
     
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  3. ph0toe

    ph0toe TPF Noob!

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    which ones would you recommend me for my usage?
     
  4. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Deppends on budget really. Carbon Fiber ones are tough and light. But more pricey. My aluminum ones are tough and fairly heavy. But can handle the biggest of cameras and big lenses (300, 400mm, and 600mm in my case) on a fairly heavy gimbal heads.

    I would match up what weight range you will be using and look at the manufacturers sites. Gitzo does make good ones as well. I know with Manfrotto I can at least get most parts, even for the older ones.

    Also you will be wanting a head, and in most cases a QR (quick release plate). Manfrotto has 3 basic plates now. RC2 and RC4's (and their older versions) are what I have. I just switched to different plates for my larger lenses (which is arca style, and better for balancing). But for my smaller lenses (that have tripod foot) and camera bodies I use the Manfrotto RC2 plates. But you will want to pick a plate style you will stick with in the future. Or you will have to change heads with new plate style.
     
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  5. ph0toe

    ph0toe TPF Noob!

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    thanks for the info. I don't really have a budget in mind. I just need one that will be sturdy and can manage my mark 3 5d canon camera with a lens attached to it. I'll mainly use it to take portrait/full body pictures for instagram and also talking in front of the camera for video, so I need to make sure it can hold still and the head for tilting the camera to get the right angles.
     
  6. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If your doing mostly studio type work, might as well save a little and get an aluminum tripod. Little heavier than carbon fiber, but 1/2 to 1/4 the cost of the carbon ones.

    As for a tripod head. It sounds like you need a typical 3-way head. They have 3 handles that you use to help position the head when you move it. Easier to make precise movements without buying the expensive geared heads.

    Manfrotto has several models of aluminum with heads from $100 to about $200 that would be decent for you. They have several weight ranges to choose from. 8.8 pound payload is about the middle.

    This one is about standard height and about 5.5 lbs with the head. Has flip locks on the legs for easy extension / retraction of the legs (better than twist locks, in my opinion). The legs will lock in 4 different angles (for heights and if your working from non level / flat surfaces). 8.8 lb payload. Uses their RC2 style QR plate.
    ManfrottoMK290XTA3-3WUS 290 Xtra Aluminum Tripod with 804 3-Way Pan/Tilt Head

    This one is about 10" shorter in max height, but about 1 pound lighter with the head. Same flip lock leg design. This is also 8.8lb payload. Uses their RC2 style QR plate.
    ManfrottoMK290LTA3-3WUS 290 Light Aluminum Tripod with 3-Way Pan/Tilt Head

    This one would be my choice for an 8.8lb payload aluminum tripod and 3 way head. The center colum will remove from the vertical mount, and cane be placed in the tripod at 90 deg angle. Then if you splay the legs out all the way. The camera will be right close to the ground. Has same 4 position legs, with flip locks for extension. And 3-way head with handles. Nearly 6# weight. Uses their RC2 style QR plate.
    ManfrottoMK290DUA3-3WUS 290 Dual Aluminum Tripod with 3-Way Pan/Tilt Head
     
  7. ph0toe

    ph0toe TPF Noob!

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    Thank you. may i ask why there are tripod that circulates around for 800+ usd? what are the major differences?
     
  8. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well I chose tripods less than $200 as most people dont even want to spend 1/2 that much. The more expensive ones, will be lighter, with larger payloads. But not always. Some your paying a bit for the name. For example Manfrotto does sell a very good carbon fiber tripod for more than double than the ones I listed. I will have a higher payload and be about 1/3 less in weight. And also the heads can get expensive, especially if you get into some of the geared and fluid heads. Tripods are like anything. There are really cheap models, basice models, intermediate ones, advanced ones, and premium ones.

    The ones I listed are a good price for what you get and will last a long time.
     
  9. chuasam

    chuasam Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Get a Gitzo or Really Right Stuff Tripod in the start and save in the long run.
    If you don’t mind weight, go with aluminum.
     
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  10. Solarflare

    Solarflare No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  11. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    The very high end gear are things like "Really Right Stuff" brand or "Gitzo" (although Gitzo is now a brand owned by Manfrotto).

    The two most popular Manfrotto lines are the "190" series (those are slightly smaller and lighter weight) and the "055" series (slightly larger and heavier weight). Those are their highest selling models.

    I own a Manfrotto 057 series tripod which is much beefier and this may be in the price range you want (roughly $800).

    057 Carbon Fiber 3 Section Tripod

    You can get it in 3-section legs vs. 4-section legs. You can get it with or without the "geared" center post.

    I like it because it uses the flip-lever locks on the legs (much faster to setup and take down). I don't use a geared center-post. The legs have an adjustable spread and you can spread them wide enough to allow the tripod to squat all the way down to just barely above ground level (the center post has to be removed for this - but the top and bottom of the center post unscrew, you remove the post, and then put the top & bottom back on the head to make a tripod with no center post and this lets you get it right down to the ground.) It's very nice.

    At that price you don't get a head... pick any head you want (it uses the industry standard 3/8"-16tpi tripod head stud.

    I have used this for astrophotography and I've done many 8-minute exposures in windy conditions with no vibration issues while holding a heavy tracking head, camera and lenses (I'm sure at some point it's possible to have vibration issues... nothing is 100% immune, but I was very happy with it's performance.)
     
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  12. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I'd say spend the money now and avoid purchasing multiple tripods over the next several years.

    Buy a gitzo or RRS tripod and you'll likely never need to buy another one as long as you live. It'll cost you $1000+ USD, but it's worth every penny.

    I went through 6-8 "cheap" tripods ($300-400) before I finally broke down and bought a Really Right Stuff TVC-34L with a BH-55 Ball Head.
     
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