What is "Bracketing"? - Homework Help!

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Masq, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. Masq

    Masq TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey guys, I'm going to miss my class today because I can't commute to school, but I know what we're doing for class. However a section of the work I do not understand, if you can inform me what the following means, I'd be grateful.

    "[FONT=Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]two examples of "bracketing" - determine the exposure for the subject which is the 0 exposure and take the photo. Photograph the subject a total of four more times at +1, +2, -1, -2."

    Does anyone have a clue what that means? Thanks for any help you can provide.
    [/FONT]
     
  2. Chris of Arabia

    Chris of Arabia Herding cats since 1988... Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2007
    Messages:
    7,825
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    The Magic Kingdom
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    At its simplest, bracketing is just a case of taking a series of photographs at exposure settings either side of what your light meter recommends.

    So for example, if your meter recommends f8 at 1/125s and call that your 0 exposure, the others would be as follows:

    +2 = f8 at 1/30s or f4 at 1/125s or f5.6 at 1/60s
    +1 = f8 at 1/60s or f5.6 at 1/125s
    0 = f8 at 1/125s
    -1 = f8 at 1/250s or f11 at 1/125s
    -2 = f8 at 1/500s or f11 at 1/250s or f16 at 1/125s

    somebody check that lot for me would you, my tea's ready...

    There are other combinations by the way.
     
  3. Sideburns

    Sideburns TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,796
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Windsor, Ontario
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    It just means
    Take an exposure based on the meter. Then, you take an exposure 1 stop under, 2 stops under, 1 stop over, and 2 stops over.

    If that's not simple enough..or you're still confused...let us know.
     
  4. HighLife

    HighLife TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Coral Springs, FL

    Im very new to this but a "stop" refers to opening and closing the aperture and the shutter (thanks for correcting that Chris)..

    When he refers to the "take an exposure, 1 stop under etc etc " your camera will take 3 shots (dont believe it snaps off 3 shots, however it will take your 1 shot and apply the bracket afterwards, really not sure of how its actually done in the camera), each shot it will have a different Ev setting...the idea behind it is that 1 of the 3 shots will have the correct exposure.

    Notice the relation to the numbers that Chris of Arabia posted....if your meter asks for a f8 and 1/125 for correct exposure, this isnt the only way to get that same exposure...say you want more DoF, if you move your aperture up 1 stop (closing the hole) you will have to move the shutter to 1/250 to get the same exposure...

    So (+2 = f8 at 1/30s or f4 at 1/125s or f5.6 at 1/60s) what does this mean? for a +2 exposure f8 at 1/30 is equal to f4 at 1/125 is equal to f5.6 at 1/60.

    Pls correct me if im wrong...im very new to this, but have read alot about it.
     
  5. Chris of Arabia

    Chris of Arabia Herding cats since 1988... Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2007
    Messages:
    7,825
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    The Magic Kingdom
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    A stop does not refer to just the aperture, it can equally mean the duration the shutter is open.

    Each stop is double the amount of light of the one before it or half the one after. Typically the following settings are available on a camera (or at least ones you have a measure of control over).

    Aperture: f22, f16, f11, f8, f5.6, f4, f2.8, f2

    Shutter: 1/1000, 1/500, 1/250, 1/125, 1/60, 1/30, 1/15, 1/8

    In the order presented (and assuming the other remains constant), each lets in twice as much light as its predecessor. The difference between each is what's known as a stop. At it's simplest, it should be apparent that a setting of f22 at 1/1000s needs one hell of a lot more available light than using f2 at 1/8s.

    Most cameras also offer the ability to access intermediary settings, generally in 1/3rd stop increments, so that you have finer level of control over the exposure.
     
  6. (Ghastly) Krueger

    (Ghastly) Krueger TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,393
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lost between tomorrow and yesterday
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Expanding a bit, if you bracket (automatically) in aperture priority mode, the aperture will remain fixed and the bracket will be made by varying the shutter speed, and vice versa. In practical terms, if you want to keep your DoF, bracket using aperture priority.

    *Edit: Thanks to Chris of Arabia for the correction ;)
     
  7. Chris of Arabia

    Chris of Arabia Herding cats since 1988... Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2007
    Messages:
    7,825
    Likes Received:
    16
    Location:
    The Magic Kingdom
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    :blushing: slight correction for clarity's sake...
     
  8. (Ghastly) Krueger

    (Ghastly) Krueger TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,393
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Lost between tomorrow and yesterday
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thanks
     
  9. mrodgers

    mrodgers No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,662
    Likes Received:
    7
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I don't have a dSLR. My camera has both the image on the back display as well as a display inside the viewfinder (meaning the viewfinder is not optical). When I use the bracketing setting on my camera and have the preview enabled, I can see (and hear) the camera taking 3 seperate shots. It would be impossible not to because bracketing within your camera uses 3 seperate shutter speeds. It can't take one shot at 3 different settings, no matter if it uses shutter, aperture, or ISO. So, it has to take 3 seperate pictures.
     
  10. HighLife

    HighLife TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Coral Springs, FL
    Yes, testing for myself its actually 3 different shots taken...i just didnt want to speak about something i had NO idea on how it really worked. I understand the concept of it, but how its actually done i was stumped =)
     
  11. Masq

    Masq TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    out of curiosity, what does the autobracketting symbol look like?

    On my dial (i've only used manual at the moment) I have the following symbols:

    A circle:
    Music Picture:
    SF:
    DEP:
    Av:
    Tv:
    P:
    L(Red Block):
    Green Rectangle:
    Face:
    Mountain/Cloud:
    Flower:
    Running Person:

    Are these common settings? Also, if anyone has any extra time, feel free to enlighten me. I'm assuming the last few settings are for landscape/etc/etc.
     
  12. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    6,111
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Montreal, QC, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    It is different on different cameras. Don't be afraid to open up your manual and look. Its not very fair to ask everyone to rewrite the manual here for you or explain things that would be easier to search for here or your manufacturer's manual.
     

Share This Page