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55 Chevy Pro Street Truck.

littlemt

TPF Noob!
Joined
May 30, 2012
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Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
bfl-2.jpg
 
a slightly different angle..

bfl-3.jpg
 
Very little detail in it. Very poor lighting / exposure! I am trying to help, although you didn't seem to want to listen last night. You were probably told these were good elsewhere (facebook?) but you are unlikely to hear that here.
 
Very cool truck but I wonder how it rides.
 
I love the truck and also the way it was shot. I've shot a lot of custom show cars over the years and shoot them in a similar manner. The sky and flames all tie into the image very well. Thanks for posting these.
 
An old high school buddy of mine had one of these! He restored it to a simply wonderful condition back in the early 1980's, and kept the truck for almost 30 years, before passing it along to the next owner. Ahhh, sweet memories. Anyway, I wish we could see more detail in the blacks of the vehicle.
 
Shooting black cars at night is like shooting polar bears in a blizzard...difficult.

In this case you need more light and then reshoot.

Also try shooting at dusk when the sky is more blue than black.
 
I like the concept if it was 1 or 2 of the images ( I like the 1st one!) but not in all of them. If you get a chance again maybe shoot to get a little more detail in the truck, as it is the main subject, and for a little variety as well.
 
Very little detail in it. Very poor lighting / exposure! I am trying to help, although you didn't seem to want to listen last night. You were probably told these were good elsewhere (facebook?) but you are unlikely to hear that here.



These shots are meant to be dark, and poor lighting, as there wasn't any lights other then a small led flashlight, I won't change, they are night shots in the darkness. I have shot this truck during the day, and those have a different theme, but at night, under the stars, this is the look I wanted to achieve.


But the feedback is still good from you and everybody, I am always curious to see how other eyes view this style.
 
Well, if these are "meant to be dark" then maybe you should reconsider how you are lighting these. There's a real, genuine, fundamental mistake you are making. What is it? if these are "supposed to be dark", then why are you using a small, point light source like an LED flashlight? Using that type of lighting is doing two things, neither of them any good at all.

First off, as we can see in the left rear wheel well's fender, there is a purple-ish hue to the highlights. That looks "faked"...it defeats the idea of matching the flames and the natural, orange sunset sky colors. The eye easily spots light sources that have wildly artificial or false-looking color temperature or hues.

The second issue with the LED light source is that it creates specular highlights in a situation where there should NOT be specular highlights. That long, thin, wrong-colored LED light source is so,so,so small that the highlights are roughly 1/4 in ch long overexposed areas...what would really show the shape of the truck are what are called "diffuse highlights"...having long, specular highlights screams out "artificial lighting added"--but, there's almost no payoff for the adding of the highlights...no shape, no volume, no contouring that really shows the beauty of a 55 Chevy truck. I am familiar with the 55 Chevy's wonderful sculptural qualities.

If you want to paint on some highlights, they'd look much more natural if the light source were about 100 to 200 times larger than an LED flashlight's source. Make the light source BIGGER, and softer, and paint on some highlight stripes, while still keeping the scene dark, and maybe add a warming gel, and you'd have a good lighting scheme, which would actually look believable, even if the overall key of the shots were to be kept very dark.
 
These shots are meant to be dark, and poor lighting, as there wasn't any lights other then a small led flashlight, I won't change, they are night shots in the darkness. I have shot this truck during the day, and those have a different theme, but at night, under the stars, this is the look I wanted to achieve.

But the feedback is still good from you and everybody, I am always curious to see how other eyes view this style.

I like the look and agree with you. The one with the front and flames Is fantastic. How did you light it?
 
These shots are meant to be dark, and poor lighting, as there wasn't any lights other then a small led flashlight, I won't change, they are night shots in the darkness. I have shot this truck during the day, and those have a different theme, but at night, under the stars, this is the look I wanted to achieve.

But the feedback is still good from you and everybody, I am always curious to see how other eyes view this style.

I like the look and agree with you. The one with the front and flames Is fantastic. How did you light it?


I walked in front of the camera, in between the camera and truck, and light painted with a small led flashlight, I hold the flashlight high and have the light hitting the vehicle at a downward angle, the exposure on these shots varied between 6 - 10 seconds.
 
Well, if these are "meant to be dark" then maybe you should reconsider how you are lighting these. There's a real, genuine, fundamental mistake you are making. What is it? if these are "supposed to be dark", then why are you using a small, point light source like an LED flashlight? Using that type of lighting is doing two things, neither of them any good at all.

First off, as we can see in the left rear wheel well's fender, there is a purple-ish hue to the highlights. That looks "faked"...it defeats the idea of matching the flames and the natural, orange sunset sky colors. The eye easily spots light sources that have wildly artificial or false-looking color temperature or hues.

The second issue with the LED light source is that it creates specular highlights in a situation where there should NOT be specular highlights. That long, thin, wrong-colored LED light source is so,so,so small that the highlights are roughly 1/4 in ch long overexposed areas...what would really show the shape of the truck are what are called "diffuse highlights"...having long, specular highlights screams out "artificial lighting added"--but, there's almost no payoff for the adding of the highlights...no shape, no volume, no contouring that really shows the beauty of a 55 Chevy truck. I am familiar with the 55 Chevy's wonderful sculptural qualities.

If you want to paint on some highlights, they'd look much more natural if the light source were about 100 to 200 times larger than an LED flashlight's source. Make the light source BIGGER, and softer, and paint on some highlight stripes, while still keeping the scene dark, and maybe add a warming gel, and you'd have a good lighting scheme, which would actually look believable, even if the overall key of the shots were to be kept very dark.


What do you figure is a good, large light source? It must be battery operated. I have tried with a stronger battery powered spotlight but it was too much.
 
Well, if these are "meant to be dark" then maybe you should reconsider how you are lighting these. There's a real, genuine, fundamental mistake you are making. What is it? if these are "supposed to be dark", then why are you using a small, point light source like an LED flashlight? Using that type of lighting is doing two things, neither of them any good at all.

First off, as we can see in the left rear wheel well's fender, there is a purple-ish hue to the highlights. That looks "faked"...it defeats the idea of matching the flames and the natural, orange sunset sky colors. The eye easily spots light sources that have wildly artificial or false-looking color temperature or hues.

The second issue with the LED light source is that it creates specular highlights in a situation where there should NOT be specular highlights. That long, thin, wrong-colored LED light source is so,so,so small that the highlights are roughly 1/4 in ch long overexposed areas...what would really show the shape of the truck are what are called "diffuse highlights"...having long, specular highlights screams out "artificial lighting added"--but, there's almost no payoff for the adding of the highlights...no shape, no volume, no contouring that really shows the beauty of a 55 Chevy truck. I am familiar with the 55 Chevy's wonderful sculptural qualities.

If you want to paint on some highlights, they'd look much more natural if the light source were about 100 to 200 times larger than an LED flashlight's source. Make the light source BIGGER, and softer, and paint on some highlight stripes, while still keeping the scene dark, and maybe add a warming gel, and you'd have a good lighting scheme, which would actually look believable, even if the overall key of the shots were to be kept very dark.


What do you figure is a good, large light source? It must be battery operated. I have tried with a stronger battery powered spotlight but it was too much.

A decent video light would do nicely.. it won't have hotspots in it like the average flashlight does. They give very even light if properly designed. Still going to have to expose properly if you want to get detail in darker areas though...
 

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