"Forgotten Long Ago..."

enezdez

TPF Supporters
Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2015
Messages
1,787
Reaction score
1,277
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
X Pro-2
f/8.0
ISO 320
1/250 Sec.
Fujifilm XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR
16 mm Equivalent 24 mm
(Processed In LR & PS)



20210215-untitled-18-Edit-Edit-Edit-Edit.jpg




Thanks For Looking Any Comments/Criticism Will Be Appreciated.


Cheers,

Enezdez
 
Last edited:

K9Kirk

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
10,691
Reaction score
6,069
Location
Central Florida (Ruskin area)
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Nice comp. but the snow is too blue. Maybe if it were taken later in the day when it isn't so bright you wouldn't have as much trouble with harsh light.
 

Space Face

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Feb 7, 2020
Messages
5,936
Reaction score
2,297
Location
UK
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Aye, it's a bit blue overall but that should be fixable in PP.
 
OP
enezdez

enezdez

TPF Supporters
Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2015
Messages
1,787
Reaction score
1,277
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Nice shot.....

@Jeff15 Thank you

Nice comp. but the snow is too blue. Maybe if it were taken later in the day when it isn't so bright you wouldn't have as much trouble with harsh light.



Aye, it's a bit blue overall but that should be fixable in PP.

Thank you both @K9Kirk & @Space Face but I intended the image to look as it does & blue is to show the coldness of the moment and it compliments the other primary colours which are elements of my composition.

Thanks Again!

Enezdez
 

smoke665

TPF Supporters
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2016
Messages
12,655
Reaction score
6,262
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
I don't have any problem with the processing. Not everything has to fit in a neat little box of standards. Going outside the norm will generally assure two types of viewers - those who like it and those who don't.

My niggle is with the composition. To be a complimentary scheme you need two colors of approximately equal weight opposite of each other on the color wheel. Blue and red are the two most prominent colors I see, but green is opposite red on the wheel not blue. The compliment of blue is orange and the only green you have is hidden in the shed. Compounding the problem is the frame is jumbled with odds and ends that don't really lead the eye or contribute. One of the first rules of compositions based on color theory is simplify, because you really want clarity as to the objects you're tying into the scheme.
 

K9Kirk

Been spending a lot of time on here!
Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
10,691
Reaction score
6,069
Location
Central Florida (Ruskin area)
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
Nice shot.....

@Jeff15 Thank you

Nice comp. but the snow is too blue. Maybe if it were taken later in the day when it isn't so bright you wouldn't have as much trouble with harsh light.



Aye, it's a bit blue overall but that should be fixable in PP.

Thank you both @K9Kirk & @Space Face but I intended the image to look as it does & blue is to show the coldness of the moment and it compliments the other primary colours which are elements of my composition.

Thanks Again!

Enezdez

That's fine, I understand now. I've gotten the same thing a few times from people and had to explain myself like you did so now I try to remember to say something about anything that stands out that can be viewed as a mistake or else I get what you got and have to explain myself to everyone that comments on it. Better to explain it just once. ;)
 

smoke665

TPF Supporters
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2016
Messages
12,655
Reaction score
6,262
Can others edit my Photos
Photos NOT OK to edit
I'm always impressed when someone starts stretching the boundaries on creativity. Over the years I've always been interested in color theory and how it can be used as either a subtle or bold element in a composition.

@enezdez I didn't address one part of your later posts, " blue is to show the coldness of the moment". That made me think about how best to show winter cold. I little light reading found some guidance on the subject which put forth the idea that there are different types of winter days with different color palettes.

First up is a "True Winter" these are high contrast, bold and bright, from pure black to pure white, these days are when colors shine like jewels. Using a color palette that reflects that, bright reds like cherry & holly berry red, emerald green, cobalt blue, rich purples and stark black and white (or those of the same color families) all in high contrast, will make it pop.

Second is "Bright Winter", an even brighter version, except the colours have a little of Spring's lightness added to them maybe even bordering florescent. A color palette that brings in a little of spring, pinks, yellows, blues, greys more to the cool side will work well on these days.

The third type is "Cool Winter". Here you start losing some of the brightness of the first two, and picking up more darkness in the shadow. You'll start to see slightly deeper colouring than their brighter counterparts. A color palette of charcoal grey, deepest indigo, navy, burgundy, and very pale grey is better pale neutral than stark white.

Finally you have "Deep Winter" which can be deceptive in its hints of warmth, more toward the late autumn palette, but with cooler accents rather than golden. Here a color palette of things like darker reds and greens, navy blue, dark forest green, stone grey, pebble grey, (the darker shades leaning toward brown). Whites are usually missing.
 

Most reactions

New Topics

Top