Help me choose an image for a tough competition - Long post

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by Raj_55555, Sep 2, 2018.

  1. Raj_55555

    Raj_55555 Indian God of Photography Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2013
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    2,042
    Location:
    India
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hello everyone, it's been a while since I've been around, and a lot of new faces. :)

    I'm participating in the Sanctuary asia wildlife photography competition, and need to submit 5 images. I have shortlisted three, but can't decide 2 among 8. Looking for some opinions - Since the judging will also be based on the circumstances and species, I have added some details.

    Please choose 2 from the 8.

    1. Snowflake Morey

    About 20 inches long, these eccentric species, despite how they look, are very hardy and can inflict serious bites. These are sought after by hobbyists for their aquarium, and have been known to survive upto 4 years in man made conditions. They prefer to hunt at night as they have poor eyesight, like most other morey, but a great sense of smell. They spend the day time hiding in rocks and crevices.

    Snowflake eels are protogynous, so the more dominant eel in the group will change from female to male. Snowflake eels are egg scatterers that produce eggs often in midwater mating rituals. Their eggs and larvae drift with plankton in the water column and settle back onto a reef at about the time of hatching. Snowflake eels are among the most challenging types of marine fish to propagate in captivity.

    [​IMG]

    2. Pregnant Male - Banded Pipefish

    Banded pipefish are also IUCN “data deficient” species – meaning not too much is known about their conservation status and are tricky to identify. They are usually about 15 cm long, with an elongated body, and patterns helping them to hide among reefs.
    The male pipefish, is equipped with the brood pouch, where the female deposits her eggs and leaves it to develop, as seen in the image with the eggs under the belly.
    The male later gives birth to the offsprings.


    [​IMG]


    3. Juvenile porcelain anemone crab (not real crab)

    Porcelain crabs can grow upto 15mm, the one in the image is a juveline is only about 3 mm in size.
    They are quite fragile, and can shed their limbs to escape predators. The large claws, which can regrow, is not used for hunting but for territorial battles.
    These crabs are not real crabs, but relatives of squat shrimps. They hide under rocks or anemones for protection from predators.

    [​IMG]

    4. Garden Eels

    These small eels, growing upto 60 cms, live in burrows on the sea floor and get their name from their practice of poking their heads from their burrows while most of their bodies remain hidden. Since they tend to live in groups, the many eel heads "growing" from the sea floor resemble the plants in a garden.
    Their diet consists of zooplankton it picks from the current as it flows past. For this reason, all the eels in a colony generally face the same direction: into the current, and look as if they are dancing with the current. These creatures, with a conservation status in IUCN - "not evaluated", make burrows in sands using their saliva, and barely ever leave. They quickly retract themselves, tail first, into its burrow if threatened.

    [​IMG]

    Nothing special to write about these:

    5. Green Turtle

    [​IMG]

    6. Cuttle fish

    [​IMG]

    7. Cuttle fish

    [​IMG]

    8. Star of the show

    [​IMG]



    _________________These are the one's I've already selected____________________

    1. Denise’s pigmy sea horse

    This 2cm long creature spends its entire life hiding in a specific gorgonian, and use adaptive camouflage changing its color and texture to match the surrounding gorgonians. They feed on small planktons. This male in the image is pregnant, and will give birth to the babies soon.
    The species is relatively rare, classified as “data deficient” by IUCN, and extremely difficult to spot due to their incredibly small size.

    [​IMG]

    2. Nudibranch/Sea slug

    Mating behavior, taken in Amed, Indonesia.
    Nudibranch, while in the their larval stage, usually have a shell, similar to other gastropods.
    These have poor eyesights, and rely on their rhinopores and oral tentacles to feel the world. These carnivorous creatures are picky carnivores, individual species usually hunting one particular type of food. The flamboyant coloration warns their predators to stay away, or die of poisoning. Depending on the species, they either make their own toxin, or acquire them from their toxic food. They are hermaphrodites, and engage in this mating ritual to fertilize each other’s future generation slugs.

    [​IMG]

    3. Bargibant's Pigmy Seahorse

    This 2cm long creature spends its entire life hiding in a specific gorgonian, and use adaptive camouflage changing its color and texture to match the surrounding gorgonians. They feed on small planktons. This male (in focus) in the image is pregnant, and will give birth to the babies soon. The female can be seen nearby although out of focus.So effective is this camouflage that the species wasn’t actually discovered until its host gorgonian was being examined in a laboratory
    The species is relatively rare, classified as “data deficient” by IUCN, and extremely difficult to spot due to their incredibly small size.
    Image taken in padangbai Indonesia.


    [​IMG]


     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
    • Like Like x 1
  2. stapo49

    stapo49 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2018
    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    647
    I like Snowflake Morey

    Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
     
  3. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2010
    Messages:
    3,647
    Likes Received:
    1,165
    Location:
    Western New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I really like #3
     
  4. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2011
    Messages:
    4,647
    Likes Received:
    1,521
    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    3 or 4 get's my vote, they are more unusual than the rest to me
     
  5. Dean_Gretsch

    Dean_Gretsch Always looking... Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2016
    Messages:
    7,584
    Likes Received:
    5,122
    Location:
    Northeastern Pennsylvania
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Definitely #4 for me.
     
  6. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    17,267
    Likes Received:
    10,740
    Location:
    Michigan
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    #4
     
  7. Raj_55555

    Raj_55555 Indian God of Photography Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2013
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    2,042
    Location:
    India
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Thank you all, I can almost everyone likes #3 - I'll take that.
    #4 also seems to be popular - will leave this overnight to see more opinions - and proceed with submission tomorrow.
     
  8. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    22,357
    Likes Received:
    7,525
    Location:
    Southern California
    I like them all!
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  9. Raj_55555

    Raj_55555 Indian God of Photography Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2013
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    2,042
    Location:
    India
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You have the same problem as me then! :345:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. DarkShadow

    DarkShadow Birdographer Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2013
    Messages:
    8,275
    Likes Received:
    4,391
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Would have been a lot easier if you had a bunch of crapy pictures in and one or two good ones.I like them all and cant choose sorry to be not of any help..
     
  11. SquarePeg

    SquarePeg hear me roar Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    8,458
    Likes Received:
    5,546
    Location:
    Boston
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hi Raj. 4, 5 and 8 are my favs of these. 4 is fantastic- love the composition. I like 5 because most turtle shots are of them swimming and this one is different plus very colorful. Love the angle of view in 8 - any chance you could expand and fill in/ clone that cut off tentacle?
     
  12. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2014
    Messages:
    22,357
    Likes Received:
    7,525
    Location:
    Southern California


    #3 and maybe #6 ... I like the eels but they're fairly common. Okay #3 and the eels.
     

Share This Page