Snowy on alert

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by zombiesniper, Feb 24, 2019.

  1. zombiesniper

    zombiesniper Furtographer Extraordinaire! Supporting Member

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    Thank you.

    I'll looking information on those owls this week.

    I was using the Canon 500mm F4 at about 60' from the owl.


     
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  2. K9Kirk

    K9Kirk Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Thanks! Much appreciated! Edit: I think I'll have to leave a little more than milk & cookies on the table for Santa to get that lens, lol! Maybe he'll trade for my motorcycle???
     
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  3. zombiesniper

    zombiesniper Furtographer Extraordinaire! Supporting Member

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    Eurasian eagle-owl Info.
    These are a very adaptable owl and can be found in many areas but prefer forested areas near rocky cliff or outcrops.
    Since this is primarily a nocturnal hunter, they will be most active near dawn or dusk.
    It is quite common for the owls to occupy the abandoned nests of other large birds, and prefer rock crevices, caves, and sheltered cliff ledges in which to do so.
    Look for them to start nesting in late Jan to early Feb. They should be on the nest now and will have young in the nest very soon.
    A good indicator would be the presence of pellets on the ground. Also check out ant large nest you see in the trees, and large enough crevices on cliff edges.

    I have found two sites on ebird in your area that have sightings within the last month.
    1st on is at the mountains edge east of Dossenheim in the Bergstraße-Odenwald Nature Park.
    2nd is 2km south East of Heidelberg
    If you check the range map on ebird you will find a single red locator point for each of these sightings.


    Tawny Owl
    This owl is also a nocturnal owl and like our Saw whet owls likes sit on a branch near the trunk of a tree during the day.
    If you have an area you have heard them in the past look for pellets at the base of trees but also keep an eye out for excrement that has flowed down the truck of a tree. This will look like a white wash flowing down the trunk of the tree. Both are great indicators that an owl has been in that tree.
    I have found one recent location 3km north East of Heidelberg. If you check the range map on bird you will find a single red locator point.


    Since both of these owls are nocturnal, you can get a better idea of their general locations and numbers (and may provide good images) by showing up to the area about an hour before sunset. Once it starts to become dusk you have a better chance of seeing them out hunting.
    For Eurasian eagle-owl this will also provide the opportunity to see where the nesting sight is since at least one of them will be guarding it. If you spot one in flight try and watch what tree/cliff crevice it goes back to. This could be a nesting sight that you could check during the day.
    This spotting technique is also good for pre dawn spotting to watch them in flight and possibly sight the nesting locations.
    The Tawny owls daytime hiding spot may be a bit more difficult to spot right away but if you can see where it flew into at dawn it can give you a good indication of an area to be searched for owl signs.


    Hope this helps.
    Good luck. Let me know how your progress goes.
     
  4. Photo Lady

    Photo Lady Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    gorgeous........ some day this is the one i would love to be lucky enough to see nevermind have the camera ready..awesome photo
     
  5. zombiesniper

    zombiesniper Furtographer Extraordinaire! Supporting Member

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    Thank you.
    They do come down to NY. You just have to keep an eye out.
    Bump me in Jan of next year and I'll keep an eye out for reports in your area.
     
  6. LK_Nature_Photography

    LK_Nature_Photography No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks for all the help. I can't wait for this snow to melt so I can hike on these mountains and search for that Eagle owl. Owls are on this year's bucket list... I looked at that map on ebird and I saw that it´s purple behind the Federsee, it´s a lake where I often go to shoot birds, I could stay longer and to look for them. Do I have to look for open terrain where they hunt? Because behind that lake there are no cliffs or such, as I know. Maybe the best would be to figure these owls out which I hear in the local forests (so I don´t need to travel each time), where do they nest, where do they hunt... But the only problem is that I have so little time, I mean they are nocturnal, and that little gap between night and day is very short. It´s a tricky animal, at night I can hear them and at day nothing, just trees, and trees till my neck hurts.
     
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  7. zombiesniper

    zombiesniper Furtographer Extraordinaire! Supporting Member

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    It may take a couple of weeks of looking at the golden hour or just around sunrise in order to localize where they are.
    Persistence and luck is how I normally find things.
    If I have an indication a target species is in the area, Jr. and I will look almost daily to find it.
     
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