24-70 F2.8 or 24-105 F4 in Studio

Discussion in 'Canon Lenses' started by selo, Sep 30, 2017.

  1. selo

    selo TPF Noob!

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    We whoot portaits in studio and use strobes for light. I already own the 24-70 F2.8 but i am looking for a second lens to leave in the studio. I am ussually shooting weddings, so for the studio we need another lens.

    For portaits we ussually shoot at F3.5 with the 24-70. But lightning is no issue, we could easily increase to F4 and adjust ISO or increase power of the strobe.

    So with that thought i was wondering if I should get the 24-105 for the studio. The extra focal length will be very valuable for us. And we dont need the extra F-stop. Is anyone using 24-105 for studio? Is it a bad call? Should I keep using the 24-70?


     
  2. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    Am I correct that you meant "shoot" rather than "whoot"?
     
  3. Peeb

    Peeb Semi-automatic Mediocrity Generator Supporting Member

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    You make a pretty good argument in favor of the 105 btw.
     
  4. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    With full frame cameras I have been moving towards 105 and 135mm length for my go to lenses from 85mm. Just recently added the 105 and 135. And occasinoally pull out the 180mm.

    Do you have to sell your initial lens to get the new one? As you are replicating much of your curent range. Now I admit I go overboard with having spares. But you should have more than 1 lens. I suggest you try and get a complimentary lens, rather than a a lens that replicates what you already have. Even if its not from Canon, possibly a version of a 70-200mm lens.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2017
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  5. selo

    selo TPF Noob!

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    I own a Canon 5d mark 4 and a Canon 6d. With 24-70 F2.8, 70-200 F2.8 and A Sigma 50mm F1.4. I am looking for a lens which we can solely use in the studio. I dont really need extra f stop for the light. And i dont mind loosing DOF. The backgrounds are close to subject so you dont get a lot of blur anyway. Also some backgrounds have a blur in them. In short i dont really see big differen between f4 and f2.8 when shooting studio.

    I am not replacing any lens. I just want a lens for studio and i like the 24 to 105mm focal length. You dont have to move around much to get closer. We will also get a 3rd body to leave in the studio. I always bring 2 bodies with me when i do wedding so would like to leave a 3rd body + a good lens in the studio. Sometimes my wife does portaits in the studio while im away shooting weddings.

    So get the 24-105mm? Brand doesnt matter for me...
     
  6. OGsPhotography

    OGsPhotography No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've been loving the 24-105. Cant see why not for your studio.
     
  7. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    i dont believe it's anywhere near as optical good as the 24-70...
     
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    But many smart studio shooters will be stopped down to f/6.3 or f/7.1 or f/8 for most flash shots done in-studio, and at those f/stops you're already being hit by the effects of diffraction, so, lens quality is not very critical at indoor studio flash apertures. A cheap kit zoom is pretty close to a $1,900 f/2.8 lens when both are stopped down to f/8 and the subjects are lighted by studiuo flash.

    I cannot imagine using f/3.5 indoors with studio flash...

    Canon's 24-105 L IS USM was a decent lens when I owned it...I think the longer length is almost mandatory; I can not imagine being limited to a top end of a mere 70mm on studio work. I definitely like 85mm, 105, and 135 and even up to 180mm and of course 200mm, for studio pictures of people. I thibk one of the millions and millions of used 24-105 f/4 L IS USM Canon lenses would make a lot of sense for a studio shooter.

    As far as downsides: depending on the specific camera model, a slowish lens, like an f/4 zoom, might have some issues in achieving rapid, precise, repeatable focus with some of the studio flash units that have LOW-powered (meaning dim) modeling lamps in the flash heads, especially with softboxes fitted to them; I have shot with flash systems that have from 250 Watt quartz lamps, to 150 Watt quartz lamps, as well as 100-Watt quartz lamps, and also some that have 25 Watt x 3 incandescent lamps...not ALL studio flash units have bright, powerful modeling lamps in them! The brightness difference between say a 250 Watt quartz halogen lamp and three, 25-Watt nightlight incandescent bulbs is HUGE!

    Like I said...yes...an f/4 lens might not be quite as fast or reliable or as predictable at focusing as say, an f/2.8 zoom, or one of the f/1.8 or f/2 prime lenses, especially as the shorter end of the zoom range.

    Some studio flash units sold today have pretty low-brightness modeling lamps in them, which can often be better if you're running the units on-location with a sine wave inverter and battery; less juice sent to the modeling lamps, but on the flip side, dimmer modeling lamp brightness.
     
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  9. selo

    selo TPF Noob!

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    @Derrel

    Thank you for your explanation. I think the 24-105 f4 would be a better choice for our studio work. The downside doesn't apply to us.. I never focus issues in the studio. We use strobes in combination with daylight or continous lights. I know we dont really have control over the lights. But our models are ussualy kids or adults that come to our studio for a fun fotoshoots. having the room dark and using flash, it scares them. Esp. baby and kids start to cry etc.

    For that reason we use F3.5 / F4 for individual shots. Higher for group shots.

    So 24-105mm is probably the best for us.
     

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