81 B warming filter usage

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Fullpower, Nov 23, 2004.

  1. Fullpower

    Fullpower TPF Noob!

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    Greetings from Alaska. i have been in the habit of using a warming filter for female portraits on print film. I just started working with a D70, and it seems that the "portrait" setting is automatically applying a bit of softening and warming tone adjustment. does this eliminate the need for glass filters in this application? thank you for the advice/tips. regards, dean
     
  2. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    I guess it all depends on the results that you're looking to get - If you find the D70 is already producing the warming effect that you're after, then there's no need to use the filter. You could always adjust the colour of the pic in photoshop if you decide you want a stronger result at a later date.

    Are you using the D70 in the same lighting conditions as your old camera? If you're taking studio portraits under controlled conditions, and you're happy with the results, then stick with it. If you're taking your shots outside, or in natural light, then the quality/warmth of the light could vary quite a lot - you might want to keep your warming filter with you for these situations.
     
  3. Fullpower

    Fullpower TPF Noob!

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    trying to figure out if i need to buy a gang of filters for the new camera. dont yet have any in 67mm.
     
  4. Shutterbug

    Shutterbug TPF Noob!

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    Bah. I don't trust digital enhancement in the camera - I always think it makes them look like they have a spray on tan.

    What I use is called a "Bastard" amber filter. It was originally used in Porn (hehe :p) but several photographers picked up on it for portraits because it worked so damn well with skin.
     
  5. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    What filter system do you use?

    I'm guessing from your second post its the type that screws onto the lens...

    You could try something like the Cokin P filter system - these work by fitting an adapter onto the lens, then dropping flat rectangular filters into the adapter - might save you a bit of money, as you only need one set of filters - all you do is buy the right sized adapter for your lens - the adapters only cost £4 or £5...
     
  6. Shutterbug

    Shutterbug TPF Noob!

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    Those are okay, but unless they sit in the adaptor so there is no space between the filter and the lens it will be bad. Light can reflect from the backside of the filter that way ao some that screws into the lens is always best.
     
  7. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    Trust me they're fine!

    Most of the well known landscape photographers use the drop-in type - check out the work of Joe Cornish (click here) - he uses the Lee filter system, which is basically the same as Cokin's, but uses a better quality glass...

    Unless you're shooting directly into the sun (in which case you'd get lens flare even with screw-ins), then drop-in filters won't cause a problem.

    Most photography books/magazines recommend the drop in type as well - there's less risk of vignetting (try stacking up a polariser, warm up, and ND Grad on a screw-in!), and you have much more control over the positioning of the filters - very important if you're using colour or ND graduates...

    and before anyone asks, no, I don't work for Cokin! :wink:
     
  8. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    Having just said all that....

    If all you're after is a warm-up filter, then sure, go for a screw in...

    but if you're gonna be using more than that, then the drop-ins give you more flexability

    :)
     
  9. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It your not shoot in raw mode with most filters; the auto-white balance will adjust for it.
    If I recall a warming filter has pink tint?
     
  10. Fullpower

    Fullpower TPF Noob!

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    yeah maybe pink with a little hint of tan thrown in.
    also might add to the generlized question: are a gang of filters obsolete in the digital realm, or is a circular polarizer, an 81a, 81b, and a ND or two still mandatory field kit? been playing on film for some time, but new to the digital equipment. thanks for the tips. dean
     
  11. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    I would say far from obsolete... the effect of certain filters can be reproduced in photoshop, but not others... Polariser for example, and certainly ND Grads - if the sky detail in your original digital image has burnt out, no amount of 'photoshopping' will bring it back - and superimposed skies from other images always look slightly un-real to me.

    I would say it was best to make your job in photoshop as easy as possible by using filters to get close to the image you have in mind, then using the editing software to tweak and fine-tune :D
     

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