A quick camera question

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by Grym, May 31, 2006.

  1. Grym

    Grym TPF Noob!

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    I have been planning on buying a nikon d200 and just appropriated the funds to do so, but now I'm having second thoughts about possibly buying 2 lower end cameras that would sdtill do an acceptable job and give me the opportunity to get a feel for possibly a canon and a nikon to see which one feels right - which models would you guys suggest? I will probably be doing wedding photography with these, which I am going to be new to, but fortunately I already have a friend in the field and I have some relatives and friends of the family that are getting married and haven't booked photographers yet so I can use them for practice. Just wondering which models you guys would suggest?
     
  2. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    Rather than buy two, if you really want to spend time with them, I would rent. Many cities have pro shops that will rent equipment out. That way you can spend the money on the one you want and put the rest into the lenses.
     
  3. Grym

    Grym TPF Noob!

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    what does everyone think about canon rebel xt and nikon d70?
     
  4. Arch

    Arch Damn You! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    They're both great cameras, and you would be saving a shed load of cash if you opted for either compared to the D200...... I use the D50 which is another for your consideration...... i would go for one of these and then spend the rest on some good glass...... lenses count for alot when it comes to quality in pictures...... spend some time over at dpreview.com and check out there reviews on these cams........


    A D200 is tempting tho i know...... probably my next body.. if i could afford it. ;)
     
  5. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    That's usually the case for film cameras, but not for digitals. Since the sensor is part of the body, it would be a lot like if film came with the body. The right film can have a bigger impact on image quality than the lens, and I think the same can be said for the digital sensor.
     
  6. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    That is so not true

    I would advise against getting two bodies, because you would need the lenses systems as well. They are not interchangeable. The good lenses with fast and quiet motors cost much more than the usual ones which make the bee sounds.

    For the canon line the XT does not even come close to what you would want to shoot a wedding with. The focus in low light is bad. The servo is not there. The layout on the prosumer and pro bodies is different.

    Now, if you want to compare them, get a 1D body and say D200 and compare those. Or maybe film bodies.

    In the end IMO the canon wins because they offer the full frame sensors and the CMOS technology gives you less noise at higher ISOs. But you pay dearly for those.


    Good luck deciding.
     
  7. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    here's a different look...

    some of the popular cameras used by weddings photographers (not the only ones that will work, just what's most commonly used from what i've seen), in order from most popular to less popular:

    1. 1d Mark II/1dIIn
    2. Canon 20d/30d
    3. Canon 5d (getting close to the amount of 20d's)
    4. Nikon d2x (pretty close to 5d)
    5. Nikon d200/canon 10d
    6. Nikon d70s/d100
    7. canon 300d/XT/d50 (fairly far behind)
     
  8. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    ??? How is that not true, and aren't you agreeing with me there? How is that not true? Digital sensors vary widely, and have a huge impact on how the image looks. While pro lenses have many pluses to them, the average person probably isn't going to see the difference in the final image. I'll bet they can tell the difference between a cheap low-density sensor and a good hi-res one though.
     
  9. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    I guess my mind misread Archangel's post. Good quality lenses do count, whether it's digital or film. Damn brain fart I didn't catch until I re-read it. My point is that body choice counts for a lot more in a digital body compared to a film body.
     
  10. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    All of it is IMO though. Let me desribe where I'm coming from:

    1) The sensor at it's native sensitivity will not change the picture at all. It's all in the post processing. Canon/nikon is the same loaded into creative suite.

    2) You can't tell any difference when you're looking at pictures at a monitor. Even my 20 inch LCD doesn't reach 2 megapixels. You need to print 8*12 at 300DPI. There you WILL be able to tell the difference.

    The funny part is that the low density sensors are the expensive ones. 5D is more expensive than 20D, yet 20D has a higher density sensor.

    The average person can do a lot of stupid things.
     
  11. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    That's my minimum. 12x18 is important to me, too. 4x6s are just proofs for me, and I think for most people who lean towards the pro side. I wasn't talking about web viewing; I meant something that you would hang on the wall. If you mean web size, then I think lens choice is immaterial. At 12x18 I can get away with using the 10D, but I would much perfer the 5D over a D60.

    The other day I saw some landscape prints someone had hanging in a coffee shop taken with a digital camera. They were very soft and not what I would consider "professional". I know that modern color printers can do amazing things, so it wasnt likely to be the printer, and if it was the lens, then it was a really super cheap lens. My guess is that the capture wasn't up to par to be printed at that size.

    And you're right, it's not all about density, but there is a difference between a good sensor and a cheapo one. Noise and low-light capability can have a huge impact. It's one of the reasons why I waited for the 10D.

    And again, I didn't mean that lens choice isn't important (I think I overstated myself earlier); just that body choice has an impact on the image when using digital. For film bodies, it doesn't at all (other than the basics, like flat film and no light leaks). It's all about the features. For film, you pick a body that goes with the lens system that you want. For digital, it's much more of a balance between the two. For current Nikon and Canon DSLR bodies, it's probably not an issue, but I think it is when comparing to the older or cheaper cameras.
     
  12. 964

    964 TPF Noob!

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    I think you have to consider what you are going to use it for.....and do a lot of research! I for example recently upgraded from a 20D to my current setup, and it was a hard decision as I tend to shoot sport/action/people and I like to have a high framerate to catch expressions on faces. The 20D has 5fps, the 1D has 8.5....so my quandary was could I justify another £1500 or so just for that...? I did research and found that the 1D has ISO in 1/3stop steps so I added that to the plus side and made the leap....

    Since then, I am absolutely delighted with the upgrade and I wish I had never purchased the 20D in the first place......not that the 20D is not a great camera, because it is....but I find everything on the 1D much more natural to use - it *seems* faster to AF, IMHO it has less noise at high ISO settings, it has a quieter shutter, it has a lower crop factor (13. to 1.6), it writes faster to the same mem cards I had before, it has better battery life, it is sealed against the elements (at least to a degree)....so all of a sudden I had som many other reasons to love it...

    My point here is, do as much research as you can and try them all out if you can. There is of course no point spending $$$$ if you don't need it, but there is also no point buying something not quite right and then spending again on something else....

    Whatever you choose, have fun choosing!
     

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