A Stupid Question

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Soul Rebel, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Soul Rebel

    Soul Rebel TPF Noob!

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    Im sure this is something I should know but I dont. When I look in the viewer of my Canon T50 I see a small circle that is split in two. Within this circle whatever I am looking at is much clearer than everything else.

    Do I focus within this small circle or the surrounding area?
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    First, there are no stupid questions! Stupid answers, though, are quite another story.

    What you are seeing is probably a central split image rangefinder - a focussing aid. Look through the viewfinder and center something with a sharp vertical edge in the split circle area. Then vary the focus of the lens while watching what happens in the circle.
     
  3. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You will learn to use either the area outside the circle or the split image inside the circle for focussing, depending on the subject. If there are strong verticals [a building, for example], the inner circle will work well. If not [sand on a beach], use the area outside the circle.
     
  4. cjoe

    cjoe TPF Noob!

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    yeah basically, if an edge or line that crosses both halves of the little circle appears to be split then it means you're out of focus. You have to try and match up the two halves of the circle so that the line becomes one.
     

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