Advice on building photography required

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Blackswann, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. Blackswann

    Blackswann TPF Noob!

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    My wife is a teacher in a small village primary school near us. I have just been asked, as an amateur photographer, to come up with a few prints that can be used to put on their web site, printed as promotional stuff... thing is I don't have the first clue about where to start.

    I was hoping for suggestions and resource links if possible... any ideas guys!!!! Thankyou in advance
     
  2. railman44

    railman44 TPF Noob!

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    Are you being asked to photograph stuctures in the village? I'm not sure what your being asked to do. If you're being asked to photograph buildings and have enough room between the camera and the building, a 50mm or a 35mm lens will do nicely. If room is not an option and you break the plane of the camera to capture the roof you will experience what's called the "keystone" effect (walls looking like they're falling in on each other). So, if you can stand far enough away from the structure to capture it or what you want of it you should be fine with a normal lens.
     
  3. Blackswann

    Blackswann TPF Noob!

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    Sorry I wasn't clear...

    Here are what they would like photographed creatively:

    Pictures of the old building - the school.
    Pictures of the surrounding village
    Amenities around the school such as the playground, swings, etc...

    I don't really have the first idea on being creative with angles with buildings (My forte is people) so am looking for advice... thanks 'railman44' for the help.

    Any more from anyone?
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    A couple of tips which may work for you:

    Don't take anything head-on, get about a 30-45 degree angle on the building - same as people portraits when you think about it.

    If it's a tall building, try and get some elevation to capture it, otherwise you'll get converging vertical angles (as railman has mentioned).

    If the scene is a bit big for your camera, try and get the horizon running diagonally from corner to corner - it's a funky look and can liven up a dull image.

    Black and White = professional photographer (in the eyes of amateurs) Use B&W for your abstract mood shots like the kids swings or the entire village from a distance - borrow a helicopter if you can :)

    If it's going in a magazine or on the web, tend towards portrait orientation shots as that's the shape of the pages normally.

    Good luck
     
  5. Morgan

    Morgan TPF Noob!

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    Hey, and look for some detail shots too! That can be anything from some stone masonry to coloured tiles etc, nice and close up!
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Another tip... try to shoot while the sun is low in the sky and falling on the front of the building. I hope it's not facing north... you'll have to wait until after the equinox if so. As Rob said, show one of the sides, and if possible, let it be the shadow side.

    If the building face north, or just to add drama, turn all the light on inside and start making a series for shots of the exterior just before dusk. Make one every couple of minutes until the light has gone.
     

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