Bitter Springs

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by abraxas, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    For all the trouble it's been getting to this place, I have to admit it's more about the history than the aesthetics.

    [​IMG]

    See below for more ...
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2009
  2. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Bitter Springs has quite a bit of historical significance. One incident goes;

    In 1858 the Williams freight company had stopped at the springs while crossing the desert. A band of Piute Indians had been following them for several days and caught up with them at the springs, the only water for 30 miles in any direction. It was late in the season and all the grass at the spring had been eaten leaving none for the freighter's hungry horses and mules. The Indians told Williams and his brother-in-law, Jehu Jackman, that they would show them a meadow nearby where there was plenty of feed for grazing--they rode off.

    A few miles away from the camp the Indians opened fire on Jackman and Williams hitting them with poisoned arrows. Jackman was struck in the neck and back, while Williams had been hit multiple times in the back and shoulders. They turned their horses and escaped back to the camp to warn the others of the ambush. Jackman was dead before they made it back. Williams was badly wounded.

    Jackman was hastily buried there at Bitter Springs before the company departed. Williams languished for several days before succumbing to his painful wounds infected from the poison in the arrows.

    Several weeks later Jackman's family returned to the spring to recover his body for a proper Mormon burial. They found that the Indians had returned and uncovered then stripped the corpse naked buring Jackman standing, exposed from the waist up (an insult). Coyotes and buzzards had savaged the body.

    This enraged the people of Los Angeles and San Bernardino and by this (and another murder) a call to action was made of the U.S. Army. A campaign to "punish" the Indians for these depradations was set into motion. And punish the Indians they did. Further acts of violence and horrific displays were made by both sides. The problem, the wrong Indians were punished.

    There's much more. But that's it in a nutshell for now.
     
  3. Rmac

    Rmac TPF Noob!

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    Nice shot, and very interesting story to boot.

    Mac,
     
  4. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thank you Mac.
     
  5. Mersad

    Mersad TPF Noob!

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    I love this shot. If it weren't for the tinge of blue in the sky it wouldn't be as good for me. But that with the overall composition and the yellow and brown tint is very effective. :thumbup: The story is interesting too and very sad.
     
  6. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks Mersad. The water is ragged-looking, but I think it is because of the coloring of the earth and vegetation. Up close it is very clear. I went near the genesis where it comes out of the ground and took a small sip--Bitter, but drinkable.
     

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