Black and White - what do I need to know?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by fadingaway1986, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. fadingaway1986

    fadingaway1986 I Burn Easily :(

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    Hey guys...

    I am wanting to do some black and white shots of my aunty while she's pregnant... But I'm not sure what film... I will probably be doing both indoors & outdoors shots, so I need something versatile...

    I doubt these will be blown up large (if at all) so grain isn't too much of a problem. (although - I would like to be able to blow up to 5x7, 6x8 without grain... or at least minimal grain)

    I'm looking at traditional B&W... (not c-41)... (however, i would be interested in knowing about any good C-41 b&w films)...

    Also, my second question...
    Is there anything I should get to use with B&W film in this situation? Ie. Filters...


    Hopefully I will be going to photo continental on friday (if i can beg my mum!)... So I should have a fairly good range of films to choose from...


    Thanks.
    Alecia

    (Not sure if it helps, but I am using Canon EOS 3000N, with 28-80mm lens and 90-300mm lense
     
  2. Artemis

    Artemis Just Punked Himself

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  3. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    One word... Ilford. Oh and an orange filter might come in handy as it will remove skin blemishes from shots... although it will also reduce the amount of light getting through the lens by a stop or so..
     
  4. ahelg

    ahelg TPF Noob!

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    If you'll be doing shots both inside and outside I expect an ISO 400 film would be best.
     
  5. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    As has been mentioned above, you'll most likely be better off with 400 ISO or higher in most indoor situations. Turn all the lights on, as you don't need to worry about tungsten balance. Use a tripod or a suitable steadying surface indoors to crisp up the shots.

    Ilford is probably the best reputed brand in B&W photography, but I prefer Kodak T-Max 400 and 3200, as I like my shots really gritty especially with people. If she has a great complexion, go for Ilford, but is she has difficult skin, use T-Max for a flattering result.

    Don't forget that background is very important with B&W, as it's a different game to colour. Pay attention to any light & dark patterns which could be distracting.

    Good luck

    Rob
     
  6. fadingaway1986

    fadingaway1986 I Burn Easily :(

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    Thanks guys...

    So... a 400 film (probably ilford)

    and when inside - turn on all lights and shoot on a plain background...


    Right?
     
  7. DIRT

    DIRT TPF Noob!

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    use good light and 400 iso works well. as for c-41 films kodak now makes a c-41 process film that rivals standard process film (they say). expose for the shadow details. good luck
     
  8. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Sounds like you've got the right approach.

    If you've got a cream or grey or blue or green linen sheet or similar, iron it and hang it over your curtain rail with the curtains drawn to get a plain mid-tone background. Don't use white unless you're absolutely certain you're metering from her, as white will throw the exposure of the shot.

    If you've got a side lamp or desk lamp which you can put a 100W bulb in, you can try making a snoot (a paper cone) to fit over it and cast a spotlight on her face & tummy. It WILL catch fire if you leave it long - don't tape it on, but it can be a very cheap professional effect.

    Also, don't do what I did and wobble on the ladder and hold onto the curtain rail for support - subsequently ripping it out the wall. Especially in someone else's house.

    :)

    Rob
     

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