Camera Blur

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by Big, May 1, 2009.

  1. Big

    Big TPF Noob!

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    Ok, so I have a Canon Powershot A650, I know it's nothing to compare to most people's cameras on this forum. I've been having a problem with low light situations when I want to defuse my flash and capture the natural light. I am trying to use the custom settings on the camera so I get the practice in for my future SLR. When I shut the flash off I need to crank up the ISO which turns the picture into a grain filled, non satisfying photo.:-x Also when anyone moves, it makes them blurry. I tried to change the shutter speed to a slower one because a higher one makes the picture really dark. I also changed the aperture to a lower setting. None of which works very well. I hate the flash in some cases. I try to avoid it when taking pictures of special moments when I want it to look like the way it was when I was there. I did manage to get one somewhat clear picture but my neice moved and made it a little blurry. I'll include some samples to show what I'm talking about. Please let me know what I can do to fix this problem.


    Completely full of noise
    Taken at ISO 1600 1/15 shutter speed and an F3.5

    [​IMG]


    Clearer but still has motion blur. Picture was taken at 0"5 shutter speed, F3.5 and at a 200 ISO.
    [​IMG]


    more motion blur...
    ISO 800, 1/10 shutter speed, F2.8
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Technological limits have been reached in this case. The light captures is a function of aperture (light cast onto the sensor), shutter speed (the time the sensor is capturing light) and the ISO (the gain of the sensor).

    When there's not enough light you need to open the aperture, slow the shutter and raise the ISO to get a sufficiently bright image. Each has issues. The aperture is as wide open as it gets, the shutter speed is already too slow if you are complaining about motion blur, and the ISO causes noise.

    The only solution really is to buy a DSLR which has a larger sensor (captures more light and thus produces lower noise at a given ISO) and allows for different lenses (some which don't zoom but offer very large apertures).


    Beyond that you need to brighten the environment. Flash directly was a bad option as you can see but you need more light. Bouncing a flash off the roof often gives good results if your camera has a flash hotshoe.
     
  3. Big

    Big TPF Noob!

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    Haha you made me smile. I've been dying to buy a DSLR for the last 2 years but I've been in college and haven't been able to afford it. I knew it was mostly the camera. It does take great pictures but whenever I shut the flash off in low light, it all turns to crap...usually. I understand how to use it but it is just below my ability. Looks like I need an upgrade to satisfy myself! :lol:
    Thank you so much for the info! I know how hard it is to try to explain to someone about technical camera stuff....like my mom, it just doesn't work
     
  4. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Photography is the art of using light. If you don't have enough you have four options and many combinations of the four. 1. Add light such as a strobe of some kind. 2. Open the aperture wider. 3. Raise the ISO. 4. Slow down the shutter speed.

    Option 1. Add light.
    Pros: Allows for lower ISO, faster shutter speeds and variable apertures.
    Cons: Can ruin or at least change the mood of the shot. A lot depends on how the light is added.

    Option 2. Wider Aperture.
    Pros: Allows for faster shutter speeds and lower ISO with out adding additional light
    Cons: Very shallow DOF can sometimes be unusable and the aperture only goes so wide. Once maxed out you have to make other compromises such as higher ISO, lower shutter speeds etc.

    Option 3. Higher ISO
    Pros: Allows for faster shutter speeds and with wide apertures with out the addition of light.
    Cons: Higher ISO = more noise and may still call for shutter speeds that are two low.

    Option 4. Slow shutter speeds
    Pros: Great for certain looks or objects that do not move.
    Cons: If is moves and the shutter speed is to low, you get blur. (just like in photo 2 & 3 above)

    Fixing the problem is like going to a Chinese restaurant. You can pick from column A, column B, column C or column D. Or you can get the combination platter. The easiest fix is to add light. One of the problems with a P&S is the lack of ability to add light in varying ways other than the built in flash. You are going to have to pick the compromise you are willing to accept in the situation you are in.

    The final option is to leave the Chinese restaurant and go to a good steak place. (DSLR) But like a good steak place vs a Chinese restaurant the cost is going to be reflected in the final bill.
     
  5. Big

    Big TPF Noob!

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    Dude, your like the photo god, I appreciate you taking the time to help me like that. I'll keep all of it in mind next time.
     

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