Choosing the Correct ISO?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by nicholasw, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. nicholasw

    nicholasw TPF Noob!

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    How should I go about selecting the correct ISO level? I understand that the higher level the ISO then the more noise I get but with faster shutter speed.

    Should i just aim to have it as low as possible then trial and error shots with a fixed aperture(depending on the shot I want) and just a variable shutter speed? Eg: if at ISO 200 I have to shoot at 1/4 second or faster to capture the action, but it comes out too dark i would up the ISO. How do i do this or calculate this without trial and error?

    Thanks! :thumbup:
     
  2. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

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    In most circumstances I judge what ISO to use by finding what works with a shutter speed of 1/100 (that is my 'safe' zone on essentially all of my lenses to avoid any shake) and within a stop of the widest aperture. Typically I try to go no farther up then ISO 800.
     
  3. revilo

    revilo TPF Noob!

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    In most situations, I'd chose an aperture that suits the depth of field I require, then I'd chose a shutter speed that suits my needs (fast enough to freeze action of a moving object, fast enough to hand hold shots etc.) and then adjust ISO till the exposure is correct. If I had to push the ISO ridiculously high, I might do a little rethinking, and adjust my exposure so I didn't have to use a high ISO and introduce lots of noise. Generally I try to keep my ISO as low as possible, but noise is preferable to inadequate depth of field, or blurring due to motion (unless that's what you want, of course).
     
  4. elemental

    elemental TPF Noob!

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    I choose my shutter speed and aperture and use ISO to get exposure correct up to about ISO 800. After that, I drop shutter speed or open aperture to keep ISO as low as possible. My camera is fine until 800, with a catastrophic dropoff thereafter (at least, by my standards). I would figure out the ISO you can live with and set accordingly.
     
  5. tsaraleksi

    tsaraleksi TPF Noob!

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    Depending on what I'm shooting, I'll do the same as elemental but either up to 1600 for sports or casual stuff, and up to 500 or so for something like a wedding.
     
  6. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    1/100 will only give you a fast enough speed for 100mm on 35mm if you are steady, usually the speed you need is the focal length you are using
     
  7. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I will start at iso100 and work my way up but will use every iso i need right up to 3200 when shooting bands
     

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