cicular polarizer

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by moracca, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. moracca

    moracca TPF Noob!

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    I bought a circular polarizer today... and I'm beginning to have second thoughts. I have a fujifilm s9000 (not an slr), and as I'm reading the packaging of the filter, it says its for SLr cameras with autofocus. Is having it a waste? will it still work correctly with my camera? Would a linear polarizer be more suitable? I tried to take some pictures through a car window with it on, and it didn't really reduce the glare at all. Does turning the end of the filter have any effect (it spins freely, but I'm not sure why)? Do i have to do anything differently for it to work right? Hopefully i can find out today, as I'm leaving town tomorrow and would like to return it if need be before then. Thanks in advance for the answers.

    //Moracca
     
  2. John_05

    John_05 TPF Noob!

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    im horrible at describing anything, so bear with me.

    the filter, as far as i know. should work just fine with your camera. it does "spin" so you can change the effect. you can turn it until it eliminates the reflection, or until it makes it more prevalent. they work best at certain angles, and that determines how much of the reflection you can eliminate. hopefully someone who knows more can stop by here and help you more. like i said, im horrible at explaining things sometimes.

    to sum it up, i dont think its a waste, and im pretty sure it will work fine on your camera. just practice using it and youll see how it works.
     
  3. moracca

    moracca TPF Noob!

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    thanks for the reply. I was just worried I bought something that was not compatible, or that something else would have been better. I've been reading a bit about circular/linear polarizers, and maybe a linear would be better, but I'm not really sure. As long as this one will work for me, thats all I'm really concerned about. Thanks again!
     
  4. PlasticSpanner

    PlasticSpanner TPF Noob!

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    If you are using an LCD screen with your PC/laptop hold the filter up to your eye & turn the ring to see it's effect!

    The more you turn the ring the more it polarises, until it gets to its' max, then reduces again!
     
  5. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The non SLR film cameras need a linear polarizer. A circular is overkill IMHO, but I'd keep it anyway for when you'll get an SLR with autofocus. All that being said though, you can use it on your camera. Manual focus SLRs need also a linear polarizer but can use the circular as well.

    Since your polarizer needs to be rotated in order to acquire the desired effect, I am asuming that it has some sort of a marking on its rotating ring, such as a colored dot or triangle. also, since it's not an SLR camera, you will not see the results until you process the film and that usually it's too late. You need to avoid that by turning the ring so the mark on it will point towards the sun. Say the sun is at 3 o'clock, turn the ring until the mark is also at 3 o'clock, as you look at the camera from your vantage point, the shooter. Am I making sense? It's late and I'm tired... :lol:
     
  6. jon_k

    jon_k TPF Noob!

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    You have to 'tune' polarizing filters to get polarization and thus prevent glare or enhance your image.

    Polarization is most effective at 90 degrees to the sun. That means your subject obtains max polarization at right angels to the suns position. With the sun right behind you or right in front of you, polarization is non existant and the filter does nothing. The best times for polarization is mid day when the sun is right above you (90 deg angle) or at sunup/sundown when the sun is on your left or right.

    If you take panoramic photos (stitching several shots together) don't use the filter. Photos will be unevenly polarized and the skies in each will look messed up when you stich them together.

    Go out there, get 90 degrees from the sun, and spin the filter and you'll see the changes yourself in the clouds right before your eyes.
     

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