Considering a move to digital

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by cal_gundert05, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    Hi all. I've been taking pictures on and off for a few years now with a Canon SLR I bought with my dad. I'm looking to start taking more pictures now, but the limitations of film (cost to buy and develop film, having to scan prints/negs to share pics online, etc) have got me considering buying a digital camera.

    The only digital camera I've used is my Mom's 3 or 4 year old 2MP Fuji. Obviously, cameras have come a long way since then, so I've got some questions about current cameras:

    1) The viewfinder on the Fuji is like that of a disposable camera--it just shows where the camera is pointed, without a true indication of optical zoom or how the shot is framed. I'd prefer to know this stuff before taking the picture, so I don't have to keep guessing and checking using the LCD screen. DO CURRENT CAMERAS HAVE VIEWFINDERS TRUE TO THE SHOT?

    2) I'd like to use manual controls sometimes, instead of resigning myself to the discretion of the camera. HOW ARE THE MANUAL SETTINGS ON CAMERAS THAT HAVE THEM?

    3) It looks like Canon's "Point-and-Shoot" cameras (like the A540, for example) have auto and various manual modes. WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ONE OF THESE AND CANON'S "HIGH-END DIGITAL CAMERAS"?

    Thanks:D
     
  2. jerseyguy

    jerseyguy TPF Noob!

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    Digital Photography
    You need a flash or a media card. You also need a standard battery and a second backup battery just in case. Some batteries last a lot longer than other do. A tripod would be nice, but is optional. Studio lights are good too, but if you are taking professional it is not necessary.refLinks('http://hobbies.expertvillage.com/experts/equipment-digital-photography.htm','What equipment is necessary for digital photography?');
     
  3. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    Uh...thanks for the respons, I guess. I say this because
    1) it really didn't address any questions, and
    2) the "expert" gave some pretty weird answers. For example, what is the "estop", "if you are taking professional it [studio lights] is not necessary", "If the picture was taken with a camera with high mega pixel then it is not going to look very good", "cannon" :confused:

    I should probably just go to a camera store, but I won't have the time until this weekend.
     
  4. Peanuts

    Peanuts TPF Noob!

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    Since you have previous experience with an SLR, have you considered going to a digital SLR set up?

    I have the Canon 350D additionally to a Canon A610 (P&S that truly isn't mine, but I use it more then the person who owns it) The manual settings on the Canon A610 are defintely a handy feature, but you will probably feel more at home with a DSLR.

    There are many others on TPF who will be able to answer your questions better, but I will take my best stab.

    1) Most digital point and shoots have the 'live' LCD feature (for lack of the correct terminology) where you don't have to look though the viewfinder, and then after you hit the shutter, the image will pop up for 5 or so seconds. Most digital SLR's have an LCD that are used for 'reviewing' or checking the histogram.

    2.)/3.) Slightly already answered these.

    Best advice is to head to the camera store, or to www.dpreview.com, determine how much you need/want to expand on. Since you already have some Canon lenses, it would make sense to purchase a Canon body if you choose to go with the DSLR, but if you aren't happy with your current lens line up, another manufacturer you might want to look at is Nikon (and there are also Pentax, Olympus etc..)
     
  5. JohnMF

    JohnMF TPF Noob!

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    Peanuts makes some good points.

    The thing with viewfinders, as Im lead to believe, is that none of them are exactly true to the shot, even your film SLR. You only notice it with digital because you have the benefit of being able to review your composition instantly on your viewfinder.
     
  6. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1. Yes, they do. Most point and shoot cameras provide a view of your shot on the LCD screen. If you want to look through the lens like you do with your SLR, then digital SLR's work exactly the same way.

    2. Again, think about a digital SLR. It will work almost the same as your SLR. The major difference is that you will set the aperture on the camera instead of on the lens. Higher end digital point and shoot cameras also have manual modes.

    3. By high end I assume you mean SLR. It would provide the functionality of your film SLR and much more. It would also provide for interchangeable lenses.

    Someone above suggested you look at an SLR and I second the motion. I'm not familiar with the Canon line but I'm sure that even the most inexpensive Canon digital SLR will do everything you want.
     
  7. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    ... eh? <scratches head>

    I would definitely recommend a dSLR over a P&S. You can get a D50 or Rebel XT for a couple $100's more than a P&S and you get a lot of value for that money.
     
  8. JeridJohnson

    JeridJohnson TPF Noob!

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    I will never willingly go back to point and shoot.. My D50 is a pleasure to shoot..
     
  9. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the replies. I WOULD like to retain manual control of the camera, and this suggests I buy a digital SLR. And if I buy a Canon, I'll already be familiar with the body and be able to use the lense from the 35mm SLR.

    HOWEVER, I've recently run across someone selling a used (but rarely) Olympus C-3030. From what I can tell, this came out right around 2000. It's got 3.3MP, full Auto, Aperture-Priority, Shutter-Priority, and full Manual modes. For ~$90, it seems like a good buy.

    But I'm worried about buying it, using it for a while, and then wanting to upgrade. DOES THE CAMERA'S AGE MATTER (ASSUMING IT HASN'T BEEN DAMAGED BY DROPPING IT, ETC)? DOES ANYONE HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH THIS MODEL, OR OLYMPUS IN GENERAL?

    Thanks again for your help.
     
  10. cal_gundert05

    cal_gundert05 TPF Noob!

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    Oh well, too late now.

    I bought the C-3030 and, although I haven't used it much yet, I'm very pleased with it.

    The viewfinder IS off in terms of framing the actual picture, but I can deal with it. What's nice is that, by default, the LCD doesn't turn on when you power up the camera, saving battery life.

    It also came with a 64MB card (not the 16 that comes when you buy the camera retail) and a "UV protector" polarizer with the necessary attachment, and an AC power adapter.

    I can't wait to start posting pics and getting feedback.:thumbsup:
     

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