copy or scan film negatives?

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by gottaknow, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. gottaknow

    gottaknow TPF Noob!

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    I am a newbie wrt to the details of film photography. I have approximately 200 photographs from approximately 1990. I believe that the original negatives still exist. Many of the photographs have important details that are "hidden" or "partially obscured" in the shadows of the prints. Assuming I can gain access to the negatives what is the best form of duplication that loses the least amount of "information" and gives me the best chance at seeing what detail may have been lost when the prints were made 20 years ago:
    a) digitally scan each negative at 4000 dpi ; or
    b) get a duplicate negative of each negative? or some other alternative...

    Thanks!
    Derek
     
  2. jenn2

    jenn2 TPF Noob!

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    In the current edition of "shutterbug", they suggest scanning the negative rather then the prints because you get up to 25 times more image information this way, if you use the best current 35mm dedicated film scanner.
     
  3. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    DPI has nothing to do with it.. its the quality of the scanner. "Best" anything is going to cost money. If you want the best, send it out to a lab... the best equipment for the job is quite expensive (think price of cars). Drum scanner is one option... of course, you want to scan from negatives.

    The next step below that would be dedicated film scanners like the Nikon 9000. These scanners are designed to scan negatives. They too can be expensive... the 9000 for example is just over $2000

    The next step below that would be flatbeds. They go from cheap to about $500-700 for the high end. The only one I would consider good enough (for me) is the Epson 700/750.

    Again... you might be better off finding an appropriately equipped lab. This is especially true if this scan is a one off project.
     

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