Depth of Field

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Tkraz, Aug 20, 2004.

  1. Tkraz

    Tkraz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Right first of all , I am aware of what this infact is, but my problem is that I am not sure how to go about creating such an effect.

    I have a Kodak point and shoot, but it has features to adjust Aperture and Shutter Speed in the manual settings.

    Having googled and been pretty unsuccesful, I was wondering if anyone could maybe help me with some basic steps or tips on how to create such an effect with the camera I have, if such a thing is possible? :)
     
  2. StvShoop

    StvShoop TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Messages:
    449
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Troy, NY
    use a small f-number (which corresponds to a large aperture)

    and make sure the distance between foreground and background is larger than the distance between camera and foreground. not sure how close to that ratio the distances actually have to be, but it works for me most of the time.
     
  3. Tkraz

    Tkraz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Right, so there is just a level, or ratio of distances along those lines where it just seems to click you mean?

    Rather than it being down to adjusting anything or any specific technique in actually taking the picture?

    Thanks mate :)
     
  4. deb

    deb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    The use of dept of field is to distort objects in the foreground and background and emphasize the subject, with will appear sharply focused in the photo.

    If you use a small aperture (large f number) you will get more consistent sharpness in all areas of the photo. If you use a large aperture (small f number), objects in front of and behind the subject on which you focused will be blurred.

    To test, take a pictuer of a friend standing a few feet in front of a shrub holding a flower arms length in front of him/her. Take one shot with a small aperture with a longer shutter speed, take the other shot with a large aperture and shorter exposure time. The second photo should render the subject clearly focused and the flowe and shrub as "circles" of light or color as opposed to focused objects.
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  6. Tkraz

    Tkraz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Aye Im familiar with what it is and the basics of it, was just wondering if anyone could lend some tips as to how to creat the effect really.

    Bit new to all of this and Im still picking it up :wink:
     
  7. deb

    deb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    What do you mean "create" the effect? Are you trying to mimick depth of field by editing digital images or are you trying to use depth of field to make a subject stand out in a picture you are about to take?

    You can mimick the effects of depth of field in photoshop by selecting the background and applying a blur filter.

    To use depth of field in composition, you use a larger aperture opening and a shorter shutter speed.
     
  8. Tkraz

    Tkraz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Sorry , I simply mean to use DOF in composition, apologies if my wording is slightly clumsy :(

    Thanks for your help, I'll give that a go :thumbsup:
     
  9. deb

    deb TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2004
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    No problem. Hope it helps.
     
  10. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I am confused. Are you asking for suggestions for using a short DOF and/or a long DOF?
     
  11. Tkraz

    Tkraz TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Either at the moment mate, Im totally new to all this and need a bit of help just testing out how to use it in a composition.
     
  12. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Well, common uses would be short DOF for portraits, and long DOF for landscapes. But experiment and bust up those common assumptions. :lol: Take 2 shots of each of your next dozen or so compositions, 1 with short DOF, and 1 with long DOF, and you'll figure it out a lot faster than anyone here could explain it to you. Try out some medium depth DOF while you're at it.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

minor white depth of field

,
minor white large depth of field
,
minor white photography wide depth of field