Dipping my toes in developing.

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Garbz, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Not literally, I believe developer shouldn't be handled without gloves. But I am looking into starting a basic darkroom to get back into film. Play a bit with some B&W films that are available.

    Now I've had a bit of a read on the topic from a book so old it's about to fall apart but I doubt much has changed. I only want to develop negatives at this point, maybe some slides at a later time, and I will ultimately scan them using the filmstrip scanner I have. So far as I know here are the basics that I need:

    - A Timer
    - A Thermostat
    - An insulated dish to control temperature of the chemicals
    - A developing tank
    - One of those little things to get the end out of the film so the roll can be unwound.
    - Developer
    - Stop bath (I heard water can be used for this)
    - Fixer

    Have I left anything out? I know that the list could be refined to specific brands, but I'm trying to get the overall view of things set first.
     
  2. Overkill-F1

    Overkill-F1 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I would suggest 'Photo-Flo' as a final rinse. It helps to minimize waterspots as the film dries. I use a Rubbermaid dish pan half-filled with water to keep the jars of chemicals and the developing tank at the right temperature. I wired in a foot switch to the timer so I can start and stop the timer as required.
    ...Terry
     
  3. KevinDks

    KevinDks TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2007
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Burley, Hampshire
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I did some b&w developing years ago, but really got back into it last year. I'm not a professional by any means, but here are my suggestions, based on that experience:

    - A Timer I sat with a stopwatch, recorded myself speaking the times - 15 seconds, 30, 45, one minute, etc, for 20 minutes and burned it to CD. I play this on a CD player while developing, so I don't have to look at a timer. I invert the tank a few times every minute, and I find it useful to time it this way

    - A Thermostat Do you mean thermometer? You certainly need one - I use a glass thermometer made for b&w developing.

    - An insulated dish to control temperature of the chemicals Before you start developing any films, here is a simple test. Get a plastic bottle, fill it with water and just let it sit in the room you will be working in for a few hours. What temperature does it settle at? I'm lucky that except on very warm summer days, here in temperate Britain my pre-mixed chemicals seem to settle at around 20 degrees, which is just right, but in Brisbane you may face more of a challenge. When necessary I use the plastic washing-up bowl from the kitchen sink, stand it on the draining board and fill it with water at 20 degrees, then put the chemicals and the tank in there (the tank will need to be weighted down, otherwise it will float). If you can keep things to within a couple of degrees of 20 centigrade then you can use the time adjustment chart from the Ilford website to make any corrections needed

    - A developing tank Yes, Patterson ones work well

    - One of those little things to get the end out of the film so the roll can be unwound. You can get a flexible plastic device to pull the end of the film back out of the roll, but there is a risk that any dirt in the felt might scratch the film. I just use a bottle opener, take the metal top off with that and pull the whole roll out

    - Developer
    - Stop bath (I heard water can be used for this)
    - Fixer


    Chemicals - all of those, plus Photoflo or similar to add to the final rinse

    Now what else? Er, changing bag (unless you have a completely dark closet or room where you can load the reel and get it into the tank). Scissors, to cut the end of the film off the little plastic thing it is rolled around (remember to put these into the changing bag with the bottle opener, the tank, reel and film before you zip it up!). Pegs to hang the film up (I have a wire coathanger which hooks on the shower rail and I hang the films from that to dry; run the shower for a few minutes first - the steam takes any dust out of the air). Something to stir the chemicals - a plastic spoon or a proper Paterson chemical mixer.

    Can't think of anything else! Let us know how you get on.

    Kevin
     
  4. kaiy

    kaiy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I think you can skip the special tool to retrieve the film end. I also use a bottle opener to pop the end off my 35mm film.

    Other misc. items: You will need at least one good measuring graduate (1000ml is a good size). I have several, so that I don't have to worry about contaminating my developer with something I've measured my fix in.

    Avoid cross chemical contamination. Don't use measuring cups, containers, stirrers for your developer that you have used to mix your fix in.

    You don't need to spend money on special clips either, clothes pins work fine.
     
  5. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Messages:
    1,314
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Steventon, Oxfordshire, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I would add a changing back to put the film(s) in the developing tank, unless you have a darkroom of course.

    Edit: OK. Already suggested in a previous post....
     
  6. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2007
    Messages:
    3,296
    Likes Received:
    465
    Location:
    Hell's Kitchen, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I use a film end retriever instead of a bottle opener (or simply hitting the end of the cassette - the way I used to do it in the darkroom) so that I can trim the film ends in the light, but it's just a personal choice.

    If you use distilled water for the final rinse you may not need a wetting agent. I dry my films on the reel, so I prefer not to use wetting agent (it has a tendency to build up on the reels).

    Unless your developing times are very short (less than five minutes or so) you can usually get away with a water rinse between the developer and the fixer.

    One thing that has changed over the decades is the use of rapid, non-hardening fixer. That's a lot more common than it used to be. Few films need to be hardened nowadays, and there are benefits to using rapid fixer for film, particularly if you use a neutral or alkaline fixer. It washes out quickly, so that wash methods that use a small amount of water (such as the fill-and-dump routine typified by Ilford's method) can be archivally effective.

    As already mentioned Paterson tanks are very popular. I use 1500-series and 2500-series Jobo tanks. The Jobos are very versatile.

    Good luck,
    Helen
     
  7. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Wow I expected this forum to be half dead, not to get 5 responses in as many hours. Good to see too, it means my questions about what I did wrong will get answered when I foul up my first negative :)

    Yes a thermometer is what I meant. I will probably use my fluke meter for this (electrical engineer here so no need for these mechanical toys)

    Overkill: I'm not sure if your name suggests this but I've read that using a simple sponge will eliminate waterspots after the final rinse. But I will keep the Photo-flo in consideration.

    I intend to start small and cheap and work my way through problems rather than layout a lot of money. And on that note a bottle opener sounds good :)

    Ok so I think I got a list of the basics. I'll start narrowing down what I need exactly and see about making a trip to photocontinental later this week.

    Cheers :)
     
  8. JamesD

    JamesD Between darkrooms

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Messages:
    1,002
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Living in Snapshot reality.
    With a sponge, you'll tend to get water beading up on the surface of the film, then drying to form spots. You can wipe it again, but the sponge should be damp, which will tend to deposit more water/prevent absorbtion. Using a dry sponge is a Bad Idea. Also, excessive handling of wet emulsions isn't recommended. Photoflo will help the water to run off. Something about surface tension, I believe.
     
  9. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 14, 2007
    Messages:
    4,263
    Likes Received:
    189
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    go to ilford's website and check out their pdf files, they have speicfic ddirections and a list of equipment you will need.

    the first roll is always the hardest, but only with getting it on the reel. other than that, it is a matter of followiong the directions and clock watching.

    have fun
     
  10. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,479
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Oregon
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I don't use a water bath to control my temps unless I'm doing color processing. 68 degrees F is pretty low and keeping your tank at that temp is pretty easy, unless of course your house is like mine and very cold. But even then I still don't use a water bath.
     
  11. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    In a darkroom far, far away...
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The following is a basic list of items needed to process black and white negative roll film. This list is based on my gear and you may find items that you do not need as well as find that you may have a need for items not listed herein.

    Developer stock solution (needs to be mixed) or …
    Developer working solution (ready to be used)
    Stop bath stock solution
    Fixing agent stock solution
    3- gallon jugs (for storage of working solutions of chemicals)
    3 or more 8-ounce glass amber bottles (for storage of stock solutions of chemicals)
    Film drying agent (for shortening drying time)
    A practice roll of film (to practice loading film into the developing tank)
    16-ounce lightproof developing tank (available in either stainless steel or plastic)
    1-120 roll film developing reel
    2-35mm roll film developing reel
    A pair of scissors
    A can opener
    A 32-ounce graduated measuring cup
    A 250 mL graduated cylindrical measure
    2-graduated measure syringes
    A plastic funnel
    3-16-ounce containers (to hold chemicals for processing)
    Instant dial thermometer (for regulating water temperature)
    30 or 60-minute timer that measures in seconds and minutes
    Wire or string (for hanging film to dry)
    Stainless steel hanging clips or wooden clothespins (for hanging and holding film straight)
    Negative archival storage sheets
     
  12. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks all. Looks like I can find most of that stuff around my house and will need to spend minimal amounts to get me started.

    Staying in the same thread but changing the topic:

    Can anyone recommend a good film or process to start with? I will eventually work my way up to colour processing E-6 and similar so I can do Velvia slides without shipping them to Sydney, but so far I am looking for something simple as my first try.

    I was thinking Kodak TMAX but the price of the developer is discouraging.

    Just to double check you need film (process) specific developer and fixer right?
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

kodak tmy-2 darkroom solution amounts

,

should ask christmas