Do I charge??? What do I charge???

Discussion in 'General Shop Talk' started by anyopa, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. anyopa

    anyopa New Member

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    My Photos Are NOT OK to Edit
    Hello All,

    As a a passerby with a photography class, I took a few pictures of the inside of a gift/tricket store (after the owner invited me in and gave me a permission). Afterwards, I sent him a few of the shots and he really like them. He has now contacted me concerning obtaining more images for ads and such. I'm a new photographer and am not sure what to do:

    1. Do I charge?
    2. If so, how much?
    3. How do I approach charging?
    4. How do I ensure that I get artist credits?
    5. Anything else I should be thinking of..


    Thanks
     
  2. Babs

    Babs New Member

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    Try doing a search on the forum. There have been a couple of similar threads recently on which people have posted advice as relevant links for copyrighting, etc.
     
  3. Dion

    Dion New Member

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    As a newbie you can get credits for it even if you do not charge by placing your name or name of your studio on the photo. New photographers do that to get recognized first. I think it would be okay if you don't charge for the first time. Or maybe they'll give you money even if you don't say it. :sexywink:
     
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish

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    Do you know about copyright and how to register yours?

    There are 3 main business models for photographers:
    1. Editorial
    2. Retail
    3. Commercial
    Most new to photography are familiar with the retail photography business model. Retail photography is doing potraits, families, maternity, kids, weddings, event, etc.

    Making photos for a business to use in advertising is the commercial photography business model. this is what youare wanting priceing information for.

    Commercial photographers charges the client a creative fee and the client then buys a use license for each image, or group of images they want to use.

    The use license explicitly describes how the client is allowed to use the photos and for what period of time.

    This business owner is hoping you are not well informed about the pricing of commercial photography so they can pay a minimal price.

    In this business model, you don't get any 'artist credit', but you can write your contract with language allowing you to use the photos for self-publishing and self-promotion.

    Be aware - When an inexperienced business person does business with an experienced business person, the inexperienced business person often gets some financially painful, experience.

    You can study some pricing information at www.ASMP.org , on the left of their home page, click on "Business Resources".

    You can also look at www.johnharrington.com and check out John's Pricing page. John does Editorial, Corporate and Commercial photography in Washingtion DC.

    Here are some other resources you could use:

    The following should not only be read, they should be kept very handy as reference materials.

    Professional Business Practices for Photographers a complilation by the ASMP (American Society of Media Photographers)
    http://www.asmp.org/

    Best Business Practices For Photographers by John Harrington
    http://www.johnharrington.com/

    Legal Guide for the Visual Artist, Fifth Edition by Tad Crawford
    Allworth Press | Books with Ideas and Solutions

    Business and Legal Forms for Photographers by Tad Crawford
    Allworth Press | Books with Ideas and Solutions

    The Photographers Guide To Negotiating by Richard Weisgrau

    A Digital Photographers Guide To Model Releases by Dan Heller
    http://www.danheller.com/

    http://www.copyright.gov/ The US Copyright Office
    http://www.uspto.gov/ The US Patent and Trademark Office
    http://www.sba.gov/ The US Small Business Administration, free business advice
    http://www.score.org/ The Service Corp of Retired Executives, another source for free or low cost source for business advice and training.
    http://www.photoattorney.com/ An attorny's blog about photography law
    http://www.thecopyrightzone.com/ An attorney duo's blog about copyright law and other photography legal issues.

    Books on composition and lighting basics.

    The Photographers Eye by Michael Freeman

    Picture This by Molly Bang

    Light: Science And Magic, An Introduction To Photographic Lighting by Hunter, Biver and Faqua

    Join -

    The National Association of Photoshop Professionals
    http://www.photoshopuser.com/?aid=luhgxq

    The Professional Photographers of America
    http://www.ppa.com/

    The Wedding and Portrait Photographers International
    http://www.wppionline.com/

    The American Society of Media Photographers
    http://www.asmp.org/
     

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