Exposure - 1/3 stop?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by prodigy2k7, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    So, i been searching around, i cant find something that talks about "stops" in photography. Such as what does 1/3 mean, what is a full stop 1/1 ?
    How are stops used when using aperature and shutter?


     
  2. ANDS!

    ANDS! No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Stops are the different "steps" between Aperture values. The 1/3 refers to the "factor" of the stop. So going from f/1.8 to f/3.6 would be one stop.
     
  3. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

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    A full stop is a doubling of the shutter speed, or a halving. For aperture, a full stop smaller aperture lets half the amount of light through the lens as a full stop larger aperture. For precision cameras let you adjust down to 1/3rd stop.
     
  4. Mav

    Mav TPF Noob!

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    f/1.8 to f/3.6 is two stops, actually. The common full stops are:

    f/1.4, f/2, f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22, etc...


    more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-stop
     
  5. someguy5

    someguy5 TPF Noob!

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    can someone explain why a bigger aperature increases the cost of the lens?
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A bigger aperture is (essentially) a bigger opening in the lens...which means a bigger barrel and larger pieces of glass for the lens elements. Also, lenses with larger apertures are usually top/pro level lenses which will usually use top quality glass and top build quality...all of which costs more money.
     

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