Film temperature question...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Scurra, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    I recently got some proper professional portraiture film (Fuji NPS 160) that has to be kept in the fridge. This is very unfamiliar territory for me, whats the deal with the fridge?

    If I load the film can I leave it in the camera for a few days between shots or is it best to take all the shots on one day?

    Also once the film is used do I have to stash it back in the fridge before I get chance to take it to be developed?

    Some tips or pointers would be useful...

    Thanks.
     
  2. Walt

    Walt TPF Noob!

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    I wouldn't worry if the film isn't going to be in the camera for an extended period of time. Refrigeration keeps the colors consistant for longer periods of time. Film tends to have a color shift over time and the idea with pro film is to keep it consistant. A lot of people keep their consumer film cool also.
     
  3. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    as far as I can help you... you should take shots during one day if this fiml really needs to be kept in a fidge... I remember what happened to my film, when I left it in a car (however there was really hot inside) ... colors were "strange" so it's better to buy ... let's say 24 exposure film an use it during one session than buying for example 34 and waiting a week to finish it. But it's only my opinion based on my experience with normal 200 iso film...
     
  4. Youngun

    Youngun TPF Noob!

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    I don't understand know that much about it, but it's basically a chemistry question. Film operates by chemical reactions involving light hitting the film. However reactions are not start/stop types of things. The reactions are always creeping forward. Temperature is a huge factor in the rate of reactions. I think it's something like every 10 degrees Celsius doubles the rate of a reaction. Putting the film in the fridge/freezer just slows down the reaction until you want it to go(when you expose the film). I would think it would be a good idea to do it before and after exposing the film. I could very well have some things off, as I don't remember that much from AP chemistry. Hope this helps.
     
  5. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    cool thanks folks...

    in that case i'll use it all in one shot and keep it in the fridge in the time being..


    One thing that still worries me though, will the film remain 'stable' after it has been exposed or would it be best to keep it in the fridge again until I can get it proccessed?
     
  6. rangefinder

    rangefinder TPF Noob!

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    The film is in a foil or plastic wrapper that is vapour tight - air and vapour cannot reach the film. Keeping the film, while in an UNBROKEN wrapper just prevents the film from spoiling over an extended period of time.

    Once the film comes out of the fridge it should be allowed to come up to ROOM temperature BEFORE breaking the wrapper. To break the wrapper before the film comes up to room temperature will allow condensation to form on the film! Not a good thing.

    Once the film is up to room temp and run through the camera it should like any other film be processed as soon as possible after exposure.

    NEVER, NEVER put the exposed roll back in the fridge. Again the condensation thing and you'll get ewater spots all over the film.

    I don't know if this is as true today as it was 20 years ago but amatuer films had a preservative backing on the film. This was because amatuers kept film in the camera for extended periods of time or on the shelf for extended periods of time until they got the chance to have it processed.

    Professional films did not have this cyan preservative therefore making immediate processing more necessary.

    In short: Store in the fridge, bring up to room temp before opening the foil to prevent condensation and NEVER return an exposed roll to the fridge (amatuer or professional).
     
  7. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    Thats what I was looking for,

    Thanks very much rangefinder, most useful!
     
  8. BernieSC

    BernieSC TPF Noob!

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    "pro" film is no different than regular color film. It can stay in your camera or even outside a refrigerator. Like all film it should be used in a timely manner and processed but its not going to self distruct if you let it set for a while.

    Pro film is kept in a controled climate like a fridge mainly by the film dealer because it is used by pros and that insures that it has not be subjected to heat or extreme conditions which could damage any film.

    But letting film set out in normal room temps or in a camera does not effect pro films anymore than it affects your regular consumer film.
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I agree that pro film will not be damaged by allowing it to remain in the camera for days, or even weeks.

    I was taught (in school and at the lab I worked at) that the difference between professional and consumer films is that pro films are designed to peak quickly after they leave the factory. Camera stores keep it refrigerated to slow down the aging process. After it peaks, color quality loss due to aging occurs much more rapidly than with consumer films.

    Consumer films are designed to peak later after they leave the factory, and maintain a higher level of color quality over a longer period of time at room temperature because they are more likely to be bought in mass quantity and stored, plus it sits on the shelf longer, in the camera bag longer, and in the camera itself longer (in 1998 the "average" American shot less than 12 exposures a year).

    I drew this example myself, but it's similar to graphs in some of my photo books.

    [​IMG]

    Also the emulsion batch is usually kept track of with pro films. This can be handy for printing when you are taking hundreds of photos with the same lighting, such as school photos.
     
  10. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    thanks ksmattfish you went to a lot of trouble and it was most informative...

    Thanks also to everyone else that educated me on this subject.
     

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