Filters

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by fightheheathens, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

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    so i just got a new filter system for my camera, basically i have a mount and i get different color filters that i can switch in and out of it, i have a red filter and so im looking for pointers on using that (i havent tired it with b&w yet) and what other types of filters are typical (for color photography)
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Do you have a Cokin system?

    There are so many filters that it would be almost impossible to list them all. There are color filters to tint or correct the image. There are special effect filters like star, soft & border filters. Some of my favorites are graduated filters, they are great for landscape shots where there is a great difference between the sky & the foreground. The list goes on and on.

    I usually like to a polarizing filter for outdoor shots but I use a circular polarizer that goes on the lens and not into the Cokin filter holder.
     
  3. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    red, orange and yellow are most commonly used in B&W for creating contrasty images. If you use them in color well then obviously they will be read, orange or yellow tinted.

    For color the only filteres I've used are soft focus, star, polarizer and ND. None of thoose change the color of the image.

    Soft focus - pretty obvious, most used for portraits

    Star - It's a diffusion filter I think that makes highlights and point light sources flare out. It's good for product shots if you want to get that bling bling look.

    Polarizer - Invaluable. The most used filter I have. Great for landscapes and reflections.

    ND - Neutral Density. Just brings the overall exposure down a few stops so that you can either use a larger aperature or a slower shutter speed. Also good for landscapes.
     
  4. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

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    wells i do have a polarizer, and ive had that for a while. ive heard light blue fliters and light orange do something, but im not sure what.
     
  5. SLOShooter

    SLOShooter TPF Noob!

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    goto conkin.com or something and I'm sure they have a product catalog or something that tells you what they all do.
     
  6. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    Neutral Density are good for flowing water, Graduated ND are good for more dramatic looking sky.
     
  7. John the Greek

    John the Greek TPF Noob!

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    speaking of filters i just bought my first cokin filters... i got the square filter adapter ring, mount, and a ND8 gradient filter.
     

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