First HDR's?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Ptyler22, Oct 20, 2008.

  1. Ptyler22

    Ptyler22 TPF Noob!

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    I tried to do some HDR's yesterday using photoshops HDR conversion tool. I am not sure they look HDR though, do they to you? Sorry about the links, png files won't show up like the JPGS
    (original)



    [​IMG]

    (HDR)
    http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn302/streettuner22/FirstHDR.png

    2.
    (original)
    [​IMG]

    (HDR)
    http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn302/streettuner22/5thHDR.png

    3.
    (original) [​IMG]

    (HDR)
    http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn302/streettuner22/4thHDR.png

    4.
    (original) [​IMG]

    (HDR)
    http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn302/streettuner22/3rdHDR.png

    5.
    (original) [​IMG]

    (HDR)
    http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn302/streettuner22/2ndHDR.png


     
  2. RebelTasha

    RebelTasha TPF Noob!

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    Did you layer 2+ pictures to get them or only try and convert the one picture?
    I could be wrong but to get a good HDR effect you need at 'least' 2 pictures taken with a tripod.
    I have done a few without a tripod.. I really recommend the tripod.. haha
     
  3. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Doesn't look HDR here either. High Dynamic Resolution images should be taken at various exposure values, usually between 3 and 5 images. You can set your camera to auto bracket and take one at -2, one at 0 and one at 2 (if doing 3 images), or -2, -1, 0, 1, 2 if doing 5 images. The idea is to get all the detail that you can from both the shadows and highlights. I usually use Photomatix for HDR conversions. I find it gives more detail than PS does usually. They have a free trial that you can use and it will just print the name of the software on the final image until you purchase it. And as previous poster said, make sure you use a tripod.
     
  4. Ptyler22

    Ptyler22 TPF Noob!

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    Ya I used 3 pictures and for the last one I used 6
     
  5. Ptyler22

    Ptyler22 TPF Noob!

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    I did use the bracketing, but it seems it isn't enough. I did as high and low as I could (+2, 0, -2) I'll have to check that trial out, and I will be getting a tripod... hopefully soon.
     
  6. RebelTasha

    RebelTasha TPF Noob!

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    Keep trying on those images because you should beable to get something nice out of them..
    While tone mapping you should beable to get all sorts of results although I'm not familiar with many HDR programs..
     
  7. 3312easy

    3312easy TPF Noob!

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    Look like heaven,beautiful

    where is it?
     
  8. beaminge36

    beaminge36 TPF Noob!

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    Well the images look fine and doesnt seem like a situation where you would need HDR. You're HDR attempts look more like saturated versions of the originals. High contrast images are much better for HDR attempts such as in daylight shooting a composition with both shade and direct sunlight. Take two shots, one exposing for the bright and one for the shade then you should be able to get that HDR look you're going for. My first HDR attempt failed due to this as well, I didn't bother looking for an HDR worthy composition with high contrast elements. I hope this helps,

    Nick
     
  9. johan.sie

    johan.sie TPF Noob!

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    i think this look not too 'HDR'ish to me
    like others have said, normally its on a very ... very contrasting situations ..
    ie: dark cloudy stormy days with bright foreground or whatnot

    :D
     
  10. Ptyler22

    Ptyler22 TPF Noob!

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    It is in Massachusetts. Right across the street from my house. It is an old Shaker barn, that has been knocked down for quite some time. I believe that it was knocked down so that it wouldn't fall and hurt somebody, I don't know how that makes sense but it looks pretty neat!. That Yellow building is actually a house and a few people live in it.
     
  11. Ptyler22

    Ptyler22 TPF Noob!

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    OK, I did bracket them, the pictures on here are the correctly exposed of the three (which I took directly from the camera with no adjustments probably why they look less contrasted. I thought that it would be a good HDR subject but maybe not. I'll keep trying! Thanks guys
     
  12. MisplacedAngler

    MisplacedAngler TPF Noob!

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    I guess that depends on what you think HDR is suppose to look like. I can tell a difference between the ones you have labeled HDR and the originals and I think the HDR one's look better. Maybe there is a certain look you were trying to achieve and didn't, but if you're trying to improve the look of your photo's, I'd say you were successful...maybe not as successful as you would have liked, but they do look better. I can tell it most in the sky.
     

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