Grey Gradient Filter for landscape?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by benjyman345, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. benjyman345

    benjyman345 TPF Noob!

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    hi,
    I have a keen interest in photography and do a bit of landscape photography. What grey gradient filter would you suggest to add to my collection?

    thanks
     
  2. fightheheathens

    fightheheathens TPF Noob!

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    unless you shoot only B&W, you'll want a true ND filter, not a grey one.

    that being said, the square ones that fit something like the Cokin P system are the way to go and hightech or tiffen are good.

    and a graduated ND2 would probably be the best place to start
     
  3. benjyman345

    benjyman345 TPF Noob!

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    why do you suggest the square type rather than circular?

    thanks

    P.s. Also... I know ND filters don't effect in-camera exposure metres but if I add a Graduated ND filter to my lens will it effect the my exposure metre being graduated.
     
  4. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Because with square filters you can place the transition between the clear part and the ND part of the filter wherever you want.

    This is the way I meter when I use a ND grad filter. I usually use them for landscape when the sky is too bright compared to the rest of the landscape. I use the camera in manual mode, meter for the ground, recompose, put the graduated filter on and take the picture. The strentgh of the filter will depend on the brightness of the sky and the effect you want to achieve.
     
  5. j_mcquillen

    j_mcquillen TPF Noob!

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    I'd agree with Steph above - square filters witha filter-holder system are much more versatile than the round screw-on ones, as you can position the grad anywhere within your composition.

    If you were to buy only one grad filter, then I'd go for a 0.6ND (or 2-stop). This will probably be suitable for most situations, however a selection of different strengths (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9) will allow you to be much more accurate with your exposures.
     

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