Handheld and tripod!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by danalec99, Apr 16, 2004.

  1. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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    What are we dealing with here? - the shaking??
     
  2. Cuervo79

    Cuervo79 Guest

    Yes, you have to choose when to use it, mostly you use it to prevent the "shaking" in the photo when you donĀ“t have enough light (say if there isn't light or if you are using a very narow aperture or using a telephoto lens) when using bulb, etc. If you are shooting sports photography a monopod is widely used instead of a tripod. its all about the shake, just depending on the circumstances
     
  3. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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    hmm.. k
     
  4. drlynn

    drlynn TPF Noob!

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    As a general rule, if you want to make prints larger than 8x10, or if your shutter speed is slower than the focal length of your lens (eg. less than 1/250th sec for a 200mm lens, 1/60th for 50mm, etc) then you need a tripod, or at least a monopod to keep the focus sharp.

    And if you do close or macro work, you want a tripod regardless, because the plane of sharpest focus is so narrow when you do macro work.

    Some people can handhold lower shutter speeds and still get good results, especially with Image Stabilizer lenses. I know Canon makes some, not sure about anyone else. But for most, that's the rule of thumb.
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    People begin using a tripod to deal with low shutter speeds/camera shake, and then realize that besides sharper pics (maybe only noticable on larger prints), the tripod slows the whole process down, and allows more time for thought, and that translates into better results (we hope). Of course, slowing down isn't appropriate for all subjects, but it can be very beneficial with others. There is no doubt that a tripod can seem very inconvenient, but if you force yourself to use one when appropriate, it becomes second nature. I have several cameras that have never been used off the tripod.
     

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