Haze filters - Anyone have any thoughts?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by djrichie28, May 17, 2008.

  1. djrichie28

    djrichie28 TPF Noob!

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    Was just looking into these Haze filters and wondering if they are worth looking into? From what I have found already, they appear to work similar to CP filters. If anyone has some thoughts, please share them. Thanks.
     
  2. 250Gimp

    250Gimp TPF Noob!

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    I believe that a haze filter works very similarily to a UV filter.

    A polarizer is a different animal all together, in that it reduces glare.
     
  3. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Do you have a link? I have heard CPs called haze filters and UV filters called haze filters as well.

    Usually 'haze' refers to a UV filter.

    Also note that digital cameras have both UV and infra-red filters built in and the UV filters used are mainly to protect the front element of the lens.
     
  4. Alfred D.

    Alfred D. TPF Noob!

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    UV filters (a.k.a. haze filters) are useful when there is excess UV light to be filtered.
    UV filters (a.k.a. haze filters) are useless when there is NO excess UV light to be filtered!
    Worse: they compromise image quality unneccessarily (increased flare, focal softness, chromatic aberration).

    So when is there excess UV light that needs filtering? That is 1) at altitude (say, over 3,000 feet), 2) in the desert or savannah, 3) at the beach, 4) at sea, or 5) in snowscapes.
    If you're not in any of these circumstances don't use a UV filter (a.k.a. haze filter), because it won't enhance the image, but instead deteriorate it.
     
  5. AndrewG

    AndrewG TPF Noob!

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    Hmm; haze (UV) filters work very well at cutting through-haze. Flare is easily avoided with a lens hood which you should use in any situation where flare might be a problem, and if you use good quality filters there should be no problem with image degradation at all. I've been using haze/skylight/UV filters on all my lenses (Nikkor Ai) for years with no issues whatsoever.
     
  6. Alfred D.

    Alfred D. TPF Noob!

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    1) Try 'with' and 'without' (on careful, quality tripod shots), and compare side-by-side on-screen. The proof of the pudding is, after all, in the eating, no?
    2) "for years"? Maybe it's time for an eye check at an optician's... Eyes deteriorate over time, you know.
     
  7. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Haze filtration is simple for black and white for those of you interested. (I mention this 'cause it ain't been talk of yet.)

    For atmospheric haze, the light that is reflecting from the atmospheric moisture must be taken into account. Blue light of midday, red filter to reduce atmospheric haze around this time. Reddish light of the golden hour, blue filter to reduce haze at this time.

    I say atmospheric haze because haze due to airborn particles such as dust, ash, etc. cannot be affected through the use of filtration.
     
  8. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I mostly use clear glass lenses as protection of my lenses. The UV/Haze/Skylight filters are not the same as a polarizer. I have a Circualr Polizer and a B Polarizer or, blue blocking polarizer. The B works great for some areas here in Arizona, like the painted desert.
     
  9. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Been there, done that, used good quality lens, compared at 100% and posted results online. Bottom line is if you have a decent filter and you're not shooting into the sun there's no degradation (how can one get CA if the filter doesn't bend the light). If you have a cheap filter you deserve everything you get.

    Interestingly I found polarisers actually do wonders in cutting through haze. It's no silver bullet but it helps. The UV filters on the other hand are quite useless at cutting through haze unless for anything other than lens protection unless you find yourself in the situations Alfred mentioned above.
     
  10. JustAnEngineer

    JustAnEngineer TPF Noob!

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    Unless the incident light rays strike the flat glass exactly perpendicular (normal) to the surface, they are refracted toward the normal as they enter the glass and away from the normal as they exit the other side of the glass into the air. For a thin pane with perfectly parallel faces, the effect should be small.

    I occasionally notice more flare with the single-coated Canon filter than with a better quality multi-coated filter.
     
  11. Alfred D.

    Alfred D. TPF Noob!

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    Any glass filter cuts UV light! Ever gotten a tan behind glass? A CP is two glass filters! You can take it for granted that it cuts 99,999% of UV light...
    Often confused with haze, of course. Haze is stuff in the air. Usually water. A light mist. Gazillions of minuscule little droplets of water floating in the air and reflecting light. Or a haze can be caused by sand, dust, in the air too. Filters don't do much for those kinds of haze.

    So that's another reason not to stack a UV filter on a CP filter, or v.v. It's useless. It doesn't add anything the CP isn't already doing. And a lot better too.
     
  12. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    The glass used for lenses and filters passes ultraviolet radiation* at the long end of the UV spectrum, which is why glass has to be specially treated to absorb at all UV wavelengths. There is no reason for polarizing filters to be made with such glass: in fact some manufacturers, such as B+W/Schneider, have published the specification for the glass they use, and it isn't special UV-absorbing glass. Glass is not, however, the only component in a polarizing filter. The polarizing foil may be much better at cutting UV than glass is. Kaesemann P-Zirk-N foil, an eample of a CP foil, is a very good absorber of UV.

    'Haze' seems to be a very loosely-defined term. A filter can do little for obscuration caused by particulate matter in the air, but it can do something about the light scattered by particulate matter and by the air itself - because that scattered light usually has certain properties. If it is scattered skylight, it has some of the properties of skylight. Even the process of scattering can it certain properties relative to wavelength and polarization - though this effect may be slight.

    *Strictly speaking ultraviolet isn't 'light', but it's probably not an important distinction except for those who strive for some degree of accuracy.

    Best,
    Helen
     

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