help - camera

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Hamish Lyon, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. Hamish Lyon

    Hamish Lyon TPF Noob!

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    hi, im new to photography im just home for the holliday from university and ive been using my sisters expensive camera for her graphic design work

    im looking for a digital camera simply because i couldnt afford to develop film during the university semester im to poor

    could i get some tips for when i go around looking for one so i dont get done over by some sales assistant - im looking for a camera i will be able to use for a while i wont have to replace if i decide to 'take my photography seriously'
     
  2. Hamish Lyon

    Hamish Lyon TPF Noob!

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    oh yeah and .... thanks in advance i know how lame it can seem when some one who dosn't know anythings starts asking silly questions ... thats if any one actually answers :p
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you do want to take photography seriously. I would suggest an SLR camera over any of the 'point & shoot' digi-cams. The reasons are many...Image quality, responsiveness, expandability, control etc.

    However, a digital SLR camera will start around $700 US. That's a pretty penny for a student. You might still be better off with a film camera and the costs of develping...but that's for you to figure out.

    If you think that you must go with a cheaper digi-cam...look for one that has the option of manual control of aperture and shutter speed. Don't get sold on mega pixels alone. More does not always mean better image quality. Digital zoom is all but useless so don't get sold on that either.

    You can get good photos from a digi-cam....but besides being small, they really don't compare at all to digital SLR cameras...so take a good look at something like the Canon Digital Rebel or the Nikon D70 or D50.
     
  4. Hamish Lyon

    Hamish Lyon TPF Noob!

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    thanks for replying :lovey:

    i had another question, i probably shouldnt put it here but: i really like taking photos based upon virtical lines but i have problems when i have scenes that i want to photogrraph but they have two or more conflicting lines and im not sure what angle/degree to take the photo from :confused: any tips? any one?

    the worst part about that question is i had im having so many problems actually figuring out what im asking
     
  5. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Turn the camera diagonally, shoot in B&W and call your photo "convergence" :)

    Rob
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Are talking about lines converging because of perspective (like pointing the camera up at a building)? You want the lens axis 90 degrees perpendicular to the vert lines. Changing your perspective is one way; getting higher, or farther way with a long lens can help.

    If that doesn't work you need a tilt/shift lens, or a view camera.
     

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